Historical, by A. Faridi (Research Seminar Academic coordinator)

November
November 14th  
 
11:00 h
 
Room 55.003

Invited Research Seminar

General-purpose audio tagging using deep learning approaches  

by Il-Young Jeong, Cochlear.ai
 
Abstract
In this talk, I will explain the techniques and models applied to the submission of Cochlear.ai team for DCASE 2018 task 2: General-purpose audio tagging of Freesound content with AudioSet labels. We mainly focused on how to train deep learning models efficiently against strong augmentation and label noise. First, we conducted a single-block DenseNet architecture and multi-head softmax classifier for efficient learning with mixup augmentation. For the label noise, we applied the batch-wise loss masking to eliminate the loss of outliers in a mini-batch. We also tried an ensemble of various models, trained by using different sampling rate or audio representation.
 
Biography 
Il-Young Jeong is a co-founder and research scientist at Cochlear.ai. He holds a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and received M.E. from Intelligent Information Processing laboratory, Sogang University. His primary interest was digital signal processing for speech recognition systems. During his PhD study at the Music and Audio Research Group, Seoul National University, he sought to expand his research area into general audio signals such as music and sound events.

November 13th

16:00h 

Room 55.003

Invited Research Seminar

From biomechanics to sound: status and challenges in the numerical simulation of voice 

by Oriol Guasch, GTM Grup de recerca en Tecnologies Mèdia

 

Abstract

Muscle activations position the articulators, which define a vocal tract geometry and posture the vocal folds. Air emanating from the lungs induces self-oscillations of the vocal folds, which result in aeroacoustic sources and the subsequent propagation of acoustic waves inside the vocal tract. There, many things could happen. For instance, the air could resonate to generate vowels, or, at constrictions, airflow may be accelerated to create turbulent sounds such as fricatives. The vocal tract walls are flexible and react to the inner acoustic pressure. Also, articulators can change the vocal tract geometry to generate vowel-vowel utterances or syllables. Sound is finally radiated from the mouth. Numerical methods have revealed as a very powerful tool for the realistic simulation of all those complex phenomena. However, attempting unified 3D numerical simulations of all the above processes, which involve coupling of a biomechanical model and the mechanical, fluid and acoustic field interactions, may seem unwise. Unified approaches have been shunned for their daunting complexity and high-performance parallel computation requirements. This situation now seems to be changing. In this talk, we briefly review recent approaches towards 3D realistic voice simulation that unify, at least to some extent, some of the involved physical fields. Remaining challenges will be highlighted. 

 

Biography

Oriol Guasch holds a five-year degree in Physics from the University of Barcelona and a PhD in Computational Mechanics and Applied Mathematics from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia. He worked for several years in industry but definitely moved to academics in 2007. He is currently a full professor at the Department of Engineering, La Salle, University Ramon Llull, where he heads the research on acoustics within the GTM (Grup de recerca en Tecnologies Mèdia). His research lines involve computational acoustics and aeroacoustics with special emphasis on numerical voice production, graph theory applied to mid and high frequency vibroacoustics, theoretical and experimental transmission path analysis, parametric array technology to generate audible sound from ultrasonic collimated beams and acoustic black holes in beams, plates and ducts. He has authored a significant number of papers in first rank international scientific journals and conferences, where he has organized and chaired many special sessions. He has also participated and been the principal investigator of several national and international projects, and recently led the scientific coordination of the EUNISON (Extensive Unified-Domain Simulation of the Human Voice) project, EU-FET no 308874.

November  9th

12:00 h

Room 52.213

Invited Research Seminar

On Deep Learning and Music

by Kyle McDonald 

Abstract

The last five years have seen incredible results from machine learning using modern neural networks, also called Deep Learning. Some of this research has presented completely new ways of working with digital media including sound and images. I will provide an informal survey of new approaches to music composition and sound synthesis based on neural networks, including some of my own work in this direction.

Biography

Kyle McDonald is an artist working with code. He is a contributor to open source arts-engineering toolkits like openFrameworks, and builds tools that allow artists to use new algorithms in creative ways. He has a habit of sharing ideas and projects in public before they're completed. He creatively subverts networked communication and computation, explores glitch and systemic bias, and extends these concepts to reversal of everything from identity to relationships. Kyle has been an adjunct professor at NYU's ITP, and a member of F.A.T. Lab, community manager for openFrameworks, and artist in residence at STUDIO for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon, as well as YCAM in Japan. His work is commissioned by and shown at exhibitions and festivals around the world, including: NTT ICC, Ars Electronica, Sonar/OFFF, Eyebeam, Anyang Public Art Project, Cinekid, CLICK Festival, NODE Festival, and many others. He frequently leads workshops exploring computer vision and interaction.

November 9th

 9:30 h

 Auditorium

Campus Poblenou

Jornada:  Innovació tecnològica a les ciutats

Jornada destinada al debat i exposició sobre tecnologies emergents i el seu impacte en les ciutats i el ciutadà. La jornada consta de dues taules rodones i una xerrada inspiracional on investigadors, empreses, emprenedors, centres tecnològics i l'administració pública adreçaran el tema des de diversos angles i iniciatives.

Organitza: UPF, Escola d'Enginyeria, Departament de Tecnologies de la Informació i les Comunicacions i UPF Ventures

Incripcions

November  8th

15:30 h

Room 55.410

PhD Research Seminar

Scientist Dating Forum

By Ryan Armstrong & Carla Conejo González

 

Abstract

The Scientists Dating Forum (SciDF) will present to the community in DTIC their approach to promote that researchers are more actively involved in society. We first got to know SciDF during the Falling Walls Lab qualifying round we co-organised in 2017, and their interests to impact on a broad number of topics, ranging from general outreach to science diplomacy, are quite well aligned with several of the priorities of the María de Maeztu transversal actions, that include opening up scientific work and setting the means that guarantee that excellent science also results in positive impacts in society.

Who is SciDF?

Scientists Dating Forum (SciDF) is a science-based association created in 2016 in Barcelona. SciDF aims to strengthen the interactions of scientists with politics, society and economics by fostering dialogue and community building.

We are a multidisciplinary young team integrated by researchers, communication specialists and people from private/public sector that share an interest in science. We are working to give to science a stronger voice in politics and economics, and strengthen its position in society. We contribute on a voluntary basis showing that the scientific community is committed to reinvent this sector and open it up.  

What does SciDF do?

SciDF wants to show how scientists through their own self-initiative try to close gaps between science and other sectors. More than 80 young and dynamic professionals from over 50 entities have been involved in the SciDF, and over 1000 people so far have attended SciDF events. These events consist of round table discussions and debates in bars (SciDF-Bars) and at institutes (SciDF-Talks), social activities for scientists and collaborations with existing institutions and programs.

We have also organized activities with other entities, such as the YoMo festival and the Festa de la Ciencia (Barcelona), and AsBioMad After Science event in Madrid.

SciDF has mobilized the scientific community of Barcelona by organizing the March for Science Barcelona 2017. We gave also a voice to science in the elections of 2017 in Catalonia: first, debating on how the independence scenario could affect research and scientists, and next, by asking all political parties to present their position on 10 different scientific policy topics, elaborating an exclusive summary for science-based vote.

SciDF opens science!

We believe that a scientific community that motivates society and politicians to participate in science, through dialogue and constructive discussions, makes more critical citizens and politicians.

 

Biography

Ryan Armstrong is a researcher in the field of management and organizations. His research interests lie primarily in two areas. First, in exploring, describing, and developing methodology for addressing complex challenges in the applied social sciences (and sometimes the natural ones). Second, in employing these methods to contribute to robust, actionable theory to help navigate the challenges brought on by the 4th Industrial Revolution: Increased technological, social, and ecological change, automation, Big Data, and uncertainty. He has published and presented on the topics of strategic management, applied philosophy, and interdisciplinarity. He is the outgoing PhD Representative for the University of Barcelona Business PhD program and for the British Academy of Management, Performance Management group. Since 2012 Ryan has worked as a consultant for organizations in Europe and the USA to support himself during his graduate education, working in strategic management, analysis, information systems, and the use of visual methods for managing complexity. Since July 2018 he has served as Treasurer for Scientists Dating Forum.

 

Carla Conejo González is the Vice-president of Scientist Dating Forum. She works at Fundació Catalunya La Pedrera, where she is the Science Projects Leader of the Area of Knowledge, Education & Research. BS in Human Biology and MS in Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological Industry at Universitat Pompeu Fabra with a degree specialization in neurobiology and research internships in the Center for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona and in the Dipartamento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie at the Università di Bologna in Italy. Scientific advisor, content researcher and creator of the TV program Quèquicom of the Canal33 (TV3). In the field of science advocacy, she is also a board member of WhatIf – Passionately Courious and has volunteered at MAGMA – Association for Promoting Youth Research, both initiatives aimed at promoting science education and dissemination by connecting science to society and facilitating access to research. Carla is also one of the founders of Associació Babu, a non-governmental humanitarian organization aimed at developing programs of health and psychological assistance worldwide.

 
Hosted by Aurelio Ruiz
 

November  8th

11:00 h

Room 52.019

Invited Research Seminar

An introduction to colour management and workflow from set to post-production

By Ariana BonaviaDIT and Dailies Colourist

Abstract

The purpose of a colour Management workflow, is to provide colour consistency throughout the entire workflow. From set to postproduction and final deliveries. Ideally on any production we would like to maintain colour accuracy regardless of the cameras, hardware and software we use. The process will need to be standardized and capable to communicate with different systems and users. In order to translate correctly the director´s vision to the final screen.

Biography

Accomplished imaging professional with over 15 years of experience. Working on set and in post production in multi-disciplinary teams in Spain, Germany and the UK for over 80 productions.
Established and managed a DIT company, providing DIT equipment and training young industry professionals.
Extensive experience creating and supervising workflows for feature film, managing data, creating dailies with a non destructive workflow (using CDL and 3DLUTs) and interacting with the Visual Effects department providing data and metadata exchange. Experience in online editing and color grading. Detailed knowledge of color space theory.
 
About her on IMBd
October  
October 29th  
 
15.30 h
 
Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Optimal Real-Time Coding of Markov Sources 

By Dr. Tamás Linder
 
Abstract
The traditional information theory of data compression allows asymptotically large coding delays, but in many applications the real-time operation is essential and even moderate delays may not be tolerated. In this talk we focus on optimal real-time (zero-delay) coding of Markov sources. After a review of some fundamental classical structural results, we give a stochastic control formulation of the optimal coding problem for a general class of real valued Markov sources. The resulting controlled Markov process facilitates the study of the existence and structure of optimal codes, but it poses subtle technical challenges due to its abstract state and action spaces. For the technically simpler case of irreducible and aperiodic discrete Markov sources we demonstrate the optimality of deterministic and stationary Markov coding policies and quantify the finite block length (time horizon) performance of such
codes. Finally, we review what is known regarding the connection of the optimal performance of zero delay codes and the so-called causal information-theoretic rate distortion function.
 
Bio
Tamás Linder received the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Budapest in 1988, and the Ph.D degree from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in electrical engineering in 1992. He was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Hawaii in 1992, and a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993-94. From 1994 to 1998 he was a faculty member of the Technical University of Budapest in the Department of Computer Science and Information Theory. He was a visiting research scholar in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego from 1996 to 1998. In 1998 he joined Queen's University where he is now a Professor of Mathematics and Engineering in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. His research interests include communications and information theory, source coding and vector quantization, machine learning, and statistical pattern recognition.

Dr. Linder is a Fellow of the IEEE. He received Premier's Research Excellence Award of the Province of Ontario in 2002 and the Chancellor's Research Award of Queen's University in 2003. He was an Associate Editor for Source Coding of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory in 2003-2004.
October 26th  
 
12:00 h
 
Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

In silico trials: how modeling and simulation and a changing regulation combined can accelerate the development and approval of new drugs and medical devices. 

By  Luca Emili, Fundador y CEO de In Silico Trials Technologies.
 
Abstract
In the past years, FDA has started to promote significantly the use of Modeling and simulation to reduce the cost and time of development and approval of new medical devices and drugs. The significant advantages, regulatory changes and the experiences from other industries are creating and consolidating this new approach. European and US approaches will be discussed with the support of the specific application in the industry. A particular focus will be on the technology transfer for models developed in Academia that Industry wants to use.
 
Bio
Luca Emili is founder and CEO of Insilicotrials Technologies, the first global platform that allows pharmaceutical and medical devices companies to accelerate research and development through models and simulations. He is member of the Cloud Security Consultative Group in EMA and responsible for the collaboration activity with FDA. With a strong passion for technology, he is focused on the development of the company for the definition of partnership with Research centers, hospitals and pharma and medical devices companies and the development of new innovative technology and services. Prior to founding Insilicotrials Technologies he worked in M&A and acted as an investor in some SME companies. From 2001 to 2010 was CEO of Emaze, an IT Security Company backed by Alice Venture, Venture Capital with funds from Mediobanca, Generali, Pirelli, Bracco, Dompè and other Italian firms. As a journalist, he published more than 40 articles on IT security Journals. Before Emaze, he was a professor of IT at the MIB School of Management of Trieste, as well as an entrepreneur in the internet services business. He has a degree in Economy and Business from the University of Trieste 

October 25th  

 
15:30 h
 
Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Gender and Science: the importance of intersectional feminism in academia

By Irene Torres , Adrián Ponce and Elisa Ruiz 
 
Abstract
Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields remain severely underrepresented. For instance, in Spain, women represent about 15% of full (catedras) professorships. Moreover, women are judged to be less competent, receive less payment and research facilities, and are less likely to be awarded research grants compared with male scientists. The different mechanisms leading to this disparity have been investigated and more is brought to light by ongoing research. In this talk we will explain the different challenges faced by women in STEM careers, the reasons and the mechanisms through which they emerge, and changes (big and small) that we can all do to improve the current dire scenario. We will also show how gender, race, class, and sexual identity discriminations are entangled and contribute to leaving out minorities from academia.
 
Host

Aurelio Ruiz 

October 18th  
 
15:30 h
 
Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Introduction to PhD Seminars 

By Aurelio Ruiz, PhD Seminars Coordinator
 
Abstract
The PhD seminars aim at creating reflection on PhD students about non-technical skills and management processes required to conduct research projects and work in international teams (such as the capability to present objectives and results to specialised and layman audiences; anticipate the ethical implications of own research; basic project and self-management skills, especially those linked to networking, team working and collaboration or understand the critical aspects linked to Intellectual Property Rights and related legal aspects), facilitate the the optimal use of all tools available at UPF and the PhD program to conduct the PhD Project (such as library services or the computational cluster) and increase the knowledge of the research conducted in the broad range of ICT areas covered by the research groups involved in the program and their collaborators
 
Bio

Aurelio Ruiz has a Telecommunications Engineering Degree (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and a Master in Science Management and Leadership (IDEC, UPF). After research and educational traineeships at Technical University Munich, EPFL and CERN, he was responsible for project management in the banking and aeronautical sectors with projects in Europe, Asia and Africa. Since 2006 he is with UPF, currently working in the management of the Maria de Maeztu strategic research program ( https://www.upf.edu/mdm-dtic )

October 11th  
 
15:30 h
 
Room Sala Aranyó del Campus Poblenou  (55s200)
PhD Research Seminar
 

The second Science and beers at the Department will take place! Following the success of the first Science and Beers, this informal meeting place consolidates as a meeting place to get to know research conducted at the department and interact with their colleagues, with a special focus on the integration of 1st year students (this Science & Beers will be the opening lecture of the PhD Seminars of the 2018-19 course).

Science and beers are organised by Adrià Arbués, Xavier Favory and Patricia Vitoria,and will have three talks by Beatriz Cabrero, Philip Tovstogan and Rasoul Nikbakht.

Don't miss it!

September
September 21st  
 
15:00 h 
 
Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

 
1) 15.00: Daniel Rueckert, Imperial College London, UK  
 

"Deep learning for medical image reconstruction, super-resolution, classification and segmentation "

 
Biography
Professor Daniel Rueckert is Head of the Department of Computing at Imperial College London. He joined the Department of Computing as a lecturer in 1999 and became senior lecturer in 2003. Since 2005 he is Professor of Visual Information Processing and leads the Biomedical Image Analysis group. He received a Diploma in Computer Science (equiv to M.Sc.) from the Technical University Berlin and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Imperial College London. Before moving to Imperial College, he has worked as a post-doctoral research fellow in the Division of Radiological Sciences and Medical Engineering, King’s College London where he has worked on the development of non-rigid registration algorithms for the compensation of tissue motion and deformation. The developed registration techniques have been successfully used for the non-rigid registration of various anatomical structures, including in the breast, liver, heart and brain and are currently commercialized by IXICO, an Imperial College spin-out company. During his doctoral and post-doctoral research he has published more than 300 journal and conference articles. Professor Rueckert is an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, a member of the editorial board of Medical Image Analysis, Image & Vision Computing and a referee for a number of international medical imaging journals and conferences. He has served as a member of organising and programme committees at numerous conferences. In 2014, he has been elected as a Fellow of the MICCAI society and in 2015 he was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and as fellow of the IEEE
 
2) 15:50: Yoshito Otake,  Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan  
 

"Patient-specific modeling of muscle fiber arrangement by registration of high fidelity cadaver data"
 

 
3) 16:30:  Julia Schnabel, King's College London, UK 
 

"Deep learning for image quality control and data labelling using attention maps"

 
Biography
Julia Schnabel has joined King's College London in July 2015 as Chair in Computational Imaging at the Division of Imaging Sciences & Biomedical Engineering, taking over the Directorship of the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Imaging, which is jointly run by King’s College London and Imperial College London. She is currently the Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London.
Julia's current research interests are in machine/deep learning, nonlinear motion modelling, multi-modality imaging, dynamic imaging and quantitative imaging for applications in cancer imaging, cardiovascular imaging, perinatal imaging and neurosciences. Her focus is on developing mathematically principled methods for correcting complex types of motion, such as sliding organs, fetal movements, as well as motion artefacts in dynamic imaging. She also has an interest in early disease detection, characterisation and prediction of response to treatment, with the aim of rapid translation into clinical practice for patient stratification and improved treatment outcome. 
ulia has co-/authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications, is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging and IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, a member of the Editorial Board of Medical Image Analysis, and has served on the programme committees of a number of international medical imaging conferences. She is a Director of the International Medical Imaging Summer School (MISS) exploring the interface between medical imaging, computer vision and machine/deep learning 
September 14th  
 
11:00 h
 
Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Patch-based MRI Analysis:From voxel to knowledge

By Pierrick Coupé , CNRS researcher at the Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique

 

Abstract
This talk will presents our work on patch-based MRI analysis dedicated quantitative MR analysis, computer-aided diagnosis and brain monitoring. First, I will introduce the principle of our patch-based segmentation method and their extensions. Second, I will show how we have extended our patch-based segmentation framework to patch-based grading of brain structures. Then, the performance of our patch-based grading method to achieve Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and prognosis will be presented. Afterwards, I will describe the tools that we developed to perform brain monitoring. Finally, the developed open access volBrain platform will be described.
 
Bio

I received the M. Eng degree in Biomedical engineering from University of Technology of Compiègne, France in 2003 and the M.Sc in Image and Signal processing degree from University of Rennes I, France in 2004. I obtained the Ph. D degree in Image processing from University of Rennes I, France in 2008 under the supervision of Dr Christian Barillot and Dr Pierre Hellier. For my Ph. D, I received the prize of the best thesis (innovation prize) from the Section France of IEEE - Chapter EMBS - SFGBM - and AGBM. Then, I worked as postdoctoral researcher at Brain Imaging Center of Montreal Neurological Institute from 2008 to 2011 under the supervision of Prof. D. Louis Collins. For this work, I was awarded a CECR postodocral fellowship. 

Now, I am working as CNRS researcher at the Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique http://www.labri.fr/  at the Bordeaux University. Since 2013 I am the leader of a new research group dedicated to patch-based image processing called PICTURA.

My research on medical image processing covers different fields, from preprocessing to automatic detection of diseases. My work mainly focuses on four topics:  Deep learning for medical imaging, BigData for medical image analysis, quantitative MR analysis, computer-aided diagnosis and image enhancement.

Host: Gema Piella

September 14th  
 
11:00 h
 
Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Patch-based MRI Analysis:From voxel to knowledge

By Pierrick Coupé , CNRS researcher at the Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique

 

Abstract
This talk will presents our work on patch-based MRI analysis dedicated quantitative MR analysis, computer-aided diagnosis and brain monitoring. First, I will introduce the principle of our patch-based segmentation method and their extensions. Second, I will show how we have extended our patch-based segmentation framework to patch-based grading of brain structures. Then, the performance of our patch-based grading method to achieve Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and prognosis will be presented. Afterwards, I will describe the tools that we developed to perform brain monitoring. Finally, the developed open access volBrain platform will be described.
 
Bio

I received the M. Eng degree in Biomedical engineering from University of Technology of Compiègne, France in 2003 and the M.Sc in Image and Signal processing degree from University of Rennes I, France in 2004. I obtained the Ph. D degree in Image processing from University of Rennes I, France in 2008 under the supervision of Dr Christian Barillot and Dr Pierre Hellier. For my Ph. D, I received the prize of the best thesis (innovation prize) from the Section France of IEEE - Chapter EMBS - SFGBM - and AGBM. Then, I worked as postdoctoral researcher at Brain Imaging Center of Montreal Neurological Institute from 2008 to 2011 under the supervision of Prof. D. Louis Collins. For this work, I was awarded a CECR postodocral fellowship. 

Now, I am working as CNRS researcher at the Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique http://www.labri.fr/  at the Bordeaux University. Since 2013 I am the leader of a new research group dedicated to patch-based image processing called PICTURA.

My research on medical image processing covers different fields, from preprocessing to automatic detection of diseases. My work mainly focuses on four topics:  Deep learning for medical imaging, BigData for medical image analysis, quantitative MR analysis, computer-aided diagnosis and image enhancement.

Host: Gema Piella

July 11
 
12:00 h
 
Room 55.003

Invited Research Seminar

Legal text processing within the MIREL project and beyond

 
By Cristian Cardellino and Laura Alonso Aleman
 
Abstract
In this talk, we will be presenting the MIREL project, that aims to formalize and reason over normative text. Within this project, our team has focussed on the automatic extraction of information from judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, namely Named Entities and Argument Components. We will present our approaches and some results on these two areas, focusing on problematic aspects and how we redefined our goals to circumvent difficult problems. We will also describe some planned applications for our work: facilitating information access and retrieval, and reading aids. We will also present preliminary work on Spanish legal text processing, with a prototype application to Argentinean Law. 
 
Further details and biography: https://www.cs.famaf.unc.edu.ar/~laura/

 July 4

16:00h

55.003

Invited Research Seminar

Identifying Idiomatic Language with Distributional Semantic Models

 

By Aline Villavicencio
 
Abstract:
Precise natural language understanding requires adequate treatments both of single words and of larger units. However, expressions like compound nouns may display idiomaticity, and while a police car is a car used by the police, a loan shark is not a fish that can be borrowed. Therefore it is important to identify which expressions are idiomatic, and which are not, as the latter can be interpreted from a combination of the meanings of their component words while the former cannot. In this talk I discuss the ability of distributional semantic models (DSMs) to capture idiomaticity in compounds, by means of a large-scale multilingual evaluation of DSMs in French, Portuguese and English. The results obtained show a high correlation with human judgments about compound idiomaticity  (Spearman’s ρ=.82 in one dataset), indicating that these models are able to successfully detect idiomaticity.
 
Biography:
Aline Villavicencio is a Lecturer/Reader in Computer Science affiliated to the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) and to the University of Essex (UK). Her research interests include lexical semantics, multilinguality, and cognitively motivated NLP. She received her PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) in 2001, and held postdoc positions at the University of Cambridge and University of Essex (UK). During 2011-2012 and 2014-2015, she was on sabbatical at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA). She is a current member of the editorial board of the Journal of Natural Language Engineering, the Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, among others, and is Area Chair for NAACL 2018, for COLING 2018 and for IBERAMIA 2018, and the Chair for the International Conference on Computational Processing of Portuguese (PROPOR 2018). She is also a regular member of the program committee for the various ACL conferences, and has co-chaired numerous *ACL workshops on Cognitive Aspects of Computational Language Acquisition and on Multiword Expressions. She has co-edited special issues and books dedicated to these topics.

July 3

11.00 h

Room 51.100

Invited Research Seminar

"TumbleBit: An Untrusted Bitcoin-Compatible Anonymous Payment Hub"

 
By Alessandra Scafuro
 
Abstract

Bitcoin was initially conceived as a way for people to exchange money anonymously. Lately, however, it was discovered that it is possible to track Bitcoin transactions and identify the parties involved.  
In this talk, I will present TumbleBit, a cryptographic protocol that allows parties to make anonymous Bitcoin payments via an untrusted server, called Tumbler.  No-one, not even the Tumbler, can tell which payer paid which payee during a TumbleBit epoch. TumbleBit consists of two interleaved fair-exchange protocols that prevent theft of bitcoins by cheating users or a malicious Tumbler. TumbleBit combines fast cryptographic computations (performed off the blockchain) with standard bitcoin scripting functionalities (on the blockchain) that realize smart contracts.

Join work with: Ethan Heilman , Leen AlShenibr , Foteini Baldimtsi,  and Sharon Goldberg
Available at: https://eprint.iacr.org/2016/575.pdf
 
 
Biography
 
Alessandra Scafuro is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at NCState. Her research focuses on the foundations and applications of Cryptography. Prior to joining NCState she held a joint postdoctoral position at Boston University and Northeastern University, and at UCLA. She received her PhD from University of Salerno in 2013.
Her recent work revolves around secure two-party computation protocols and protocols to enhance anonymity on blockchain.

July 3

12:30 h

Room 51.100

Invited Research Seminar

"Post-quantum cryptography from supersingular isogeny problems?" 

By Christophe Petit 

Abstract

We review existing cryptographic schemes based on the hardness of computing isogenies between supersingular isogenies, and present some attacks against them. In particular, we present techniques to accelerate the resolution of isogeny problems when the action of the isogeny on a large torsion subgroup is known, and we discuss the impact of these techniques on the supersingular key exchange protocol of Jao-de Feo. 

Biography

Christophe Petit is a Lecturer in Computer Security in the University of Birmingham's School of Computer Science, and a member of the Security and Privacy research group. Previously he was a Research Fellow at the University of Oxford's Mathematical Institute, where he helped founding the Cryptography group,and prior to that he worked at Université catholique de Louvain's Department of Electrical Engineering and at University College London's Computer Science Department.

June 14

15:30 h

Room 51.100

PhD Research Seminar

Design of Experiment - decreasing the time of a study by increasing its reliability

By Simone Tassani

 
Abstract
This second part of seminars on statistical analysis is focused over use of ANOVA theory, previously introduced, in order to design campaigns of experiments or of simulations. During the course will be introduced Complete Factorial and Fractional Factorial analysis along with Latin squares and Taguchi methods.
The meaning of confounded effects will be introduced along with the generation of analysis blocks.
The course will close presenting the Response Surface Methodology

June 13

15:30 h

Room 51.100

PhD Research Seminar

Design of Experiment - decreasing the time of a study by increasing its reliability

By Simone Tassani

Abstract
This second part of seminars on statistical analysis is focused over use of ANOVA theory, previously introduced, in order to design campaigns of experiments or of simulations. During the course will be introduced Complete Factorial and Fractional Factorial analysis along with Latin squares and Taguchi methods.
The meaning of confounded effects will be introduced along with the generation of analysis blocks.
The course will close presenting the Response Surface Methodology

June 8

15:30 h

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar 

Designing expressive engagement with electronic and hyper instruments

By Hans Leeuw

Abstract
Hans Leeuw is the designer of the Electrumpet, a hyper instrument that was first designed in 2008. In his talk he will discuss the recent improvements on the instruments in relation to a persona model for instrument design that is based on values-led design. Beside the talk Hans Leeuw will also play as a demonstration of his instrument.
 
Host: Sergi Jordà

June 7

15:30 h

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Reflecting on the PELARS project and Multimodal Learning Analytics

By Daniel Spikol, PhD

Associate Professor, Faculty of Technology and Society, Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Malmö University, Sweden

Abstract

The talk presents key results and lessons learnt from the Practice-based Experiential Learning Analytics Research and Support (PELARS) project. PELARS was a three-year project that developed a learning analytics system to investigate small group learning for open-ended engineering tasks. The aim is to share the results and challenges of the project to further the dialogue about how to increase progress for multimodal learning analytics (MMLA). The theories and different methods of the project will be discussed that include the different sensors used to capture, record, and analyse students physical interactions and how we used this data to create models to understand aspects of collaboration. To investigate the multimodal data, we started with a simple grading of the student's final products and progressed to a richer framework for assessing student non-verbal collaboration with different machine learning strategies. Some of the results illustrate that body location and movement are strong features for further investigating collaboration. However, challenges remain across the sustainability and ethics of how this data can be used to support the learners and teachers in creative, open-ended activities.

Biography

Scientist, educator, and creative technologist investigating how people learn and play. Spikol works for Malmö University and is a group leader in the Internet of Things and People Research Center. He previously worked for Linnæus University and  Interactive Institute (RISE Swedish Research Institute). Spikol's passion is to design and develop digital experiences to provoke people's curiosity to explore the physical and digital world around them. Spikol combines a background in design, digital art, and computer science to investigate how people learn and play. He has over 60 scientific publications and digital art installations. He has worked for various companies, founded several companies, and actively works to integrate design, science, industry, and culture. His current research looks at understanding how people to collaborate to solve open-ended design tasks with physical computing with the aim to inspire learners for computational tinkering and thinking.

June 6

15:30 h

Room 52.S27

PhD Research Seminar

Design of Experiment - decreasing the time of a study by increasing its reliability,

By Simone Tassani

 
Abstract
This second part of seminars on statistical analysis is focused over use of ANOVA theory, previously introduced, in order to design campaigns of experiments or of simulations. During the course will be introduced Complete Factorial and Fractional Factorial analysis along with Latin squares and Taguchi methods.
The meaning of confounded effects will be introduced along with the generation of analysis blocks.
The course will close presenting the Response Surface Methodology

May 24

15:30h

Room 55.309

PhD Seminars

How to do good experiments online / Good practices for online experiments

By:

 

 

Abstract

User experiments can be crucial for researchers who need to evaluate methods involving humans, or gather human-generated data. The Web has created an alternative to expensive lab experiments: online and crowdsourcing experiments are valuable resources for research which can bring many advantages. However, online experiments introduce different challenges which need to be addressed carefully in order to be accurately performed. This seminar aims at sharing good practices when performing online-based experiments as well as crowdsourcing research. First this talk will give an overview of the ways in which online experiments can be used. Then, the following researchers from the department will present their work and share valuable advices:

 

  • Xavier Favory will present Freesound Datasets, a collaborative platform for the creation of open audio datasets.
  • Maria Rauschenberger will draw your attention to  possible pitfalls and lessons learned from conducting a online experiment for children at the age of 7 till 12 for different languages with a web-game.
  • Davinia Hernández-Leo will present the Integrated Learning Design Environment 2 (ILDE2), a community platform for learning design.

Background material

Making better use of the crowd. NIPS 2016, ACL 2017, and KDD 2017

Instructor: Jenn Wortman Vaughan

http://www.jennwv.com/projects/crowdtutorial.html  

May 10

15:30 h

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

The experience by PhD students (2)

By:

Adrià Arbués, Image Processing Group

Data Science in Sports and experience during the 1st year in the PhD program

Merljin Blaauw, Music Technology Group

Singing synthesis and his motivation for doing a phd after years of industrial research projects, spinoff, etc

Olga Slizovskaia, Music Technology Group and Image Processing Grou

Multimodal video analysis for music information retrieval. You can read part of her experience over the past 2 years in the blog of the MdM program

May 8

15:30 h

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Learning Deep Networks from ranked data

By Joost van de Weijer 

Abstract

In the second part of the talk I will discuss two applications of the decomposition of fully connected layers into several layers.  Deep Neural Networks trained on large datasets can be easily transferred to new domains with far fewer labeled examples by a process called fine-tuning. However, networks designed to be optimal for the source task are often prohibitively large for the target task. We show how layer decomposition can be used to effectively compress the network. In addition, we will show how layer decomposition can be used for the task of learning without forgetting where the task is to learn new tasks without forgetting previously learned tasks. We will show how this can be used to improve the diagonal assumption underlying the Fisher information matrix for the Elastic Weight Consolidation algorithm. The work in this talk is presented at ICCV 2017 and CVPR 2018.

Biography

Joost van de Weijer is  the leader of the Learning and Machine Perception Team (LAMP) and a senior researcher at the Computer Vision Center (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona). His main research interest is in applying color imaging theory to the field of computer vision: color constancy, color naming, object recognition, recoloring algorithms, color feature detection and color feature extraction.

May 7

15:30 h

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Efficient Sound Synthesis By Recursive Digital Filters In Parallel Form: Virtual Musical Instruments And Artificial Reverberation

By Esteban Maestre

Computational Acoustic Modeling Laboratory, McGill University

Abstract

Recursive digital filters in parallel form offer a number of advantages. Besides their suitability for parallel implementation, improved numerical precision and parametric control are some of their attractive features. This talk will cover some recent progress in using frequency-domain optimization techniques to design high-order recursive parallel filters suited for the efficient simulation musical instruments and reverberation via modal synthesis.  

The presentation will first introduce novel methods to render musical instrument sound by combining the digital waveguide and modal synthesis frameworks. Through a modal analysis technique based on constrained optimization of parallel filter coefficients, measured resonator immitances are faithfully reproduced via an efficient modal formulation that allows their realization as lumped elements within a digital waveguide model. Sound examples will be provided for wind and string instruments.

Then, the problem of designing a modal reverberator to match a measured room impulse response will be considered. The modal reverberator architecture expresses a room impulse response as a parallel combination of resonant filters, with the pole locations determined by the room resonances and decay rates, and the zeros by the source and listener positions. The method first estimates the pole positions in an iterative process involving a series of constrained pole position optimizations in overlapping frequency bands. With the pole locations in hand, the zeros are fit to the measured impulse response using least squares. Example models for a medium sized room will be provided.

 

Host: Dr.Xavier Serra

April 26

15:30 h

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Experiences by PhD students

By:

  • Ahmed Eladly (BERG) : New technology to restore movement in paralysis
  • Irene Vigué Guix  (MRG):  A mnemonic system based on stimulation-free neuroimaging.
  • Èric Lluch (Physense):  Meshless method for cardiac mechanics modelling
  • Alp Öktem (TALN):  Generating punctuation in Transcribed Speech: Combining lexical and prosodic features using parallel recurrent neural networks 

April, 6

12:30 h

Room 24.009 (Ciutadella Campus)

Invited Research Seminar

Neural Mechanisms for Perceiving Object Motion During Self-Motion

By Greg DeAngelis

Abstract

Many organisms have highly evolved neural circuits for processing visual motion cues. However, most laboratory studies of visual motion perception are performed under highly simplified conditions in which there is no self-motion such that object motion in the world directly maps onto retinal image motion. Under many natural conditions, however, we must judge object motion during self-motion, which greatly complicates the problem. Thus, the brain needs to parse the complex pattern of retinal image motion into components that correspond to object motion and self-motion. In addition, to compute object motion in world coordinates, the brain must estimate self-motion and factor it into computations of object motion.  I will describe two studies that make important progress into understanding the visual and multi-sensory mechanisms by which the brain computes object motion during self-motion.  I will show that neural activity in macaque area MT reflects the operation of a “flow parsing” mechanism (which has been previously established in human psychophysics) that discounts global optic flow resulting from self-motion.  I will also show that neural activity in area VIP reflects flexible computation of object motion in either world- or head-centered coordinates.  Together, these studies begin to reveal critical neural processes that are involved in perceiving object motion under more natural conditions in which self-motion also occurs.

April, 5

15:30 h

Room 52.219

PhD Research Seminar

Introduction to Software Licensing 

By Malcolm Bain, idLaw partners

Abstract

When using and developing open source software, there are a number of considerations to take into account that go beyond the pure technical aspects. Malcolm Bain will introduce and review the legal aspects of using and developing open source software, with a focus on licensing, license choice and license compliance obligations with distributing products that are or embed open source components.  

Biography

Malcolm Bain is an English solicitor and Spanish lawyer, specialising in Information Technology and Intellectual Property law, and co-founder of id law partners (now part of BGMA, a Barcelona based law firm). He has a wide experience representing clients on both sides of IT transactions, and advises on licensing, software contracts, technology transfer, copyright, privacy and trademark issues. He has participated in various R+D projects and written and lectured on many aspects of IT law, e-commerce and internet regulation.

April, 3

15:00 h

Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

One size doesn't fit all: towards adaptive and personalized text simplification

By Joachim Bingel

Abstract

Most previous research in text simplification has aimed to develop generic, broad-scale solutions that assume very homogeneous target audiences. However, this assumption does not hold, as attested by evidence that different groups (such as dyslexics, language learners or beginner readers), but also individuals within these groups, differ strongly with respect to their simplification needs.
 
This talk proposes methods that take us closer to personalized and adaptive text simplification systems. Using online learning techniques, these systems collect explicit and implicit feedback from users to continuously learn to model their individual simplification needs. We further show that multitask learning can be used to effectively transfer knowledge about simplification needs between different user groups as well as individuals.

Biography

Joachim Bingel is a final-year PhD student at the University of Copenhagen, supervised by Anders Søgaard. His primary research interests include adaptive models for text simplification and multitask learning, as well as the combination of these. Joachim has further published papers in corpus linguistics and the usage of cognitive data to improve NLP models. He has a Master's degree from the University of Heidelberg and has previously worked as a researcher at the Institute for the German Language in Mannheim.

Host

Monika Dominguez

March, 27th

15:30 h

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Conditional Risk Minimization for Stochastic Processes

By Alexander Zimin

Abstract

We study the learnability of stochastic processes with respect to the conditional risk, i.e. the existence of a learning algorithm that improves its next-step performance with the amount of observed data. We introduce a notion of pairwise discrepancy between conditional distributions at different times steps and show how certain properties of these discrepancies can be used to construct a successful learning algorithm. In addition to theoretical results that establish criteria for learnability for many classes of stochastic processes, we provide a practical algorithm that can be efficiently implemented and applied to real data.

Biography

Alexander is a PhD student at IST Austria working in the group of Christoph Lampert. He obtained his Master degree from Central European University in 2013 under supervision of Laszlo Gyorfi and Gergely Neu. His research is focused on various machine learning scenarios, which involve dependent data. Previously he has also worked on online learning and reinforcement learning.

Host

Gergely Neu

March, 19

10:00

55.410

Invited Research Seminar

The influence of cellists' postural movements on their musical expressivity

By Joselyn Roze, Université Aix-Marseille

Abstract

The musician's body is often deeply forgotten in the traditional instrumental pedagogy. In the case of bowed-string instrumentalists, the attention is required to be paid on the fingers' dexterity at the left hand or the bow accuracy at the right hand, like preliminary and mandatory conditions for musical expressivity. However, just by observing the play of great violinists or cellists, we can realize that they use postural movements more or less consciously, which are far away from their purely instrumental gestures involved in the sound production. What would be thus the function of these corporeal movements ? If they visually contribute to make a performance more lively, we actually don't know their influence on the perceived expressive acoustical features, such as the musical phrasing or the sound quality.


In my thesis, we try to bring some response elements by investigating the cellists' ancillary movements and their influence on the musical expressivity. On the gesture side, we focus on the chest and head displacements, which are the most salient visually but also the most essential for the cellist's motor planning. On the acoustical side, we focus on the two principal means of producing musical expressivity : the rhythmic and the timbre. This investigation takes place within various areas implying different perspective levels : Instrumental pedagogy, musician's posture, cellist's physiology, and more globally musical embodiment. The influence of postural movements on the musical expressivity is assessed by the means of four postural conditions affecting the cellists' sensorimotor mechanisms : A standard playing condition and three gradual immobilization constraints (mental, physically immobilized by the chest, and finally by the chest and the head). Within each postural session, the bow playing mode (short détaché or large legato) has been chosen as a studying factor of the crossed relationships between sound and motion.
The first part of the thesis highlights the relationships between the cellist's postural movements and their rhythmical expressivity. It appears that the coordination between posture and movement of a cellist is optimal with a good postural-kinetic capacity, which allows to keep the balance by resisting to bow expansions. The natural symbiosis between the musician and his cello also turns out to be a key factor for the metric and rhythmic cohesion between trunk ancillary gestures and instrumental bowing. The rhythmical unbalance caused by the absence of postural movements is particularly repeatable during passages requiring a good motor coordination between the two arms. The
discomfort felt is assessed stronger in the bowing mode détaché, which coincides with a bigger uniformity in speed modulations and inter-note timbre colors. The second part of the thesis is dedicated to the detailed exploration of the timbre for a note frequently increased in harshness within the postural constraint by chest and head. This acoustical degradation is generally linked with a weaker bow speed and a narrower gesture of the instrumental right arm. By tracing back to the central body parts, we highlighted the importance of the spine torsion and the right shoulder opening for the sound quality. The whole of these works support flexibility in the postural movement freedom for producing a balanced and expressive play.

Biography

Graduated from the french engineer school in Electronic and Informatics (EFREI), Jocelyn Rozé worked eight years as a consultant for an information-technology service company (ALTEN). Around the end of this period, he discovered the cello and developed a passion for playing this instrument. Jocelyn then tried to redirect and choose a professional career likely to merge his technical skills to his instrumental passion. He found this opportunity by starting a PhD thesis at the Laboratory of Mechanic and Acoustic (LMA) of Marseille on the topic entitled : « The influence of cellists’ postural movements on their musical expressivity ». He obtained his doctorate degree in 2017 and now he continues a post-doctoral research on the same context to refine and promote his thesis results.

March, 14

12:30

Auditorium

PhD Research Seminar
 
The statistical foundations of learning to control
 
By Ben Recht
 
Abstract
Given the dramatic successes in machine learning and reinforcement learning over the past half decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in applying these techniques to continuous control problems in robotics, self-driving cars, and unmanned aerial vehicles.  Though such control applications appear to be straightforward generalizations of standard reinforcement learning, few fundamental baselines have been established prescribing how well one must know a system in order to control it.  In this talk, I will discuss how one might merge techniques from statistical learning theory with robust control to derive such baselines for such continuous control.  I will explore several examples that balance parameter identification against controller design and demonstrate finite sample tradeoffs between estimation fidelity and desired control performance.  I will describe how these simple baselines give us insights into shortcomings of existing reinforcement learning methodology.  I will close by listing several exciting open problems that must be solved before we can build robust, safe learning systems that interact with an uncertain physical environment.
 
Biography
Benjamin Recht is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Ben's research group studies the theory and practice of optimization algorithms with a focus on applications in machine learning and data analysis. They are particularly interested in busting machine learning myths and establishing baselines for data analysis. Ben is the recipient of a Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, the 2012 SIAM/MOS Lagrange Prize in Continuous Optimization, the 2014 Jamon Prize, the 2015 William O. Baker Award for Initiatives in Research, and the NIPS Test of Time Award.

March, 12

15:30

Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar
 
Music Technology for STEAM Education
 
By   Dr. Aggelos Gkiokas, Postdoctoral Research Associate.
&
Kosmas Kritsis, Research Associate.
Institute for Language and Speech Processing (ILSP), 
Athena Research and Innovation Center


Abstract
 
The educational movement of STEAM is about bringing Arts at the heart of the academic curriculum in order to cultivate creative skills of young people, alongside with the knowledge and skills they acquire in STEM fields (i.e. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). As a STEAM-oriented solution, the iMuSciCA project (Interactive Music Science Collaborative Activities) presents an interdisciplinary pedagogy framework that connects different disciplines with each other on an inquiry and collaborative manner. It directly addresses the current requirements in education and learning for new pedagogical methodologies and innovative educational technology tools by supporting active, discovery-based, personalized and more engaging learning, while providing students and teachers with opportunities for collaboration, co-creation and collective knowledge building. iMuSciCA offers a suite of software tools and services mostly related to music which are built on top of new enabling technologies, and are integrated on a web-based platform that delivers interactive music activities to secondary school students with the aim to support mastery of core academic content on STEM subjects (Physics, Geometry, Mathematics, and Technology). Enabling technologies, including interactive pen on touchpad, 3D object design and printing, as well as new multimodal interfaces that combine advanced music generation and processing, are deployed in order to implement a web-based workbench aiming at STEAM learning. The contribution of the Institute for Language and Speech Processing in the iMuSciCA project involves the development of methods for interacting with virtual music instruments using camera sensors, the development of advanced real-time visualization tools for music analysis, the deployment of algorithmic composition methods for enhancing music creativity as well as applying conventional Music Information Retrieval techniques in the context of a STEAM education platform.

Biography

Dr. Aggelos Gkiokas is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute for Language and Speech Processing of Athena Research and Innovation Center (ILSP/ATHENA RIC). He holds a PhD Degree in Music Information Retrieval and his main research interests are automatic music rhythm analysis, music similarity, audio visualization. 

Kosmas Kritsis is a Research Associate at the Institute for Language and Speech Processing of Athena Research and Innovation Center (ILSP/ATHENA RIC). He is a PhD Candidate at the department of Informatics of the University of Piraeus (UniPi) and holds a MSc in Sound & Music Computing from Pompeu Fabra University of Barcelona (UPF). His academic experience and research interest includes scientific areas, such as Human-Computer Interaction, Audio Signal Processing, Computer Vision and Machine Learning.

March, 8

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

The power of ordinary people in the Web - Studying quality and inequalities in User Generated Content

By  Diego Sáez-Trumper

Host: Aurelio Ruiz

Abstract

Internet utopia came with the promise of democratize the access to knowledge, and allows to create, share and receive free information. But after 26 years of the releasing of the first Web Browser, how is people producing, receiving, and propagating information in the Internet? In this talk, I will introduce my work on the usage of massive data processing (a.k.a Data Science) for studying digital prints of human behavior, as well as discuss how Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence can be used to empower people on the digital era, specially in  the context of a free knowledge community, where we want to use those techniques not to replace, but to support human judgment

Biography

Diego Sáez-Trumper is a Research Scientist at Wikimedia Foundation. Before, he was a post-doctoral researcher at Yahoo! Labs (Barcelona) and Research Scientist at Eurecat , Data Scientist at NTENT, and part time lecturer at UPF. He holds a diploma on Acoustic Engineering (Universidad Austral de Chile, 2006) and  obtained his Phd in Information Technology from Universitat Pompeu Fabra (2013) under the supervision of Dr. Ricardo Baeza-Yates. During his PhD he interned at Qatar Computing Research Institute, University of Cambridge  and Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil. 

March, 7

15:30

Room 55.410

Phd Research Seminar

Extended Minds and Machines 

By Karina Vold 

 

Abstract

Traditional cognitive science subscribes to the computational theory of mind, which says that our thoughts are realized by neural computations, or symbol manipulations, carried out by our brains. Philosophers Clark and Chalmers (1998) roughly accept the computational theory of mind but argue that when we use tools, such as smartphones and tablets, they can become seamlessly integrated into our cognitive processes such that computations in the tools are just as essential to our cognition as computations in our brain: smartphones extend our cognition. The ‘extended mind thesis’ is an increasingly popular view in philosophy of mind and cognition. It maintains not only that technologies can compensate for biological deficiencies, but also that technologies can augment our minds and enhance our biologically bound cognitive capacities, making us smarter and more capable agents (e.g. Sutton 2007; Menary 2007).

 Given our cognitive reliance on technology, recent advancements in artificial intelligence may be cause for concern. The outcomes of algorithms can have adverse effects on human-decision making: take the case of biased risk-assessment algorithms used to predict recidivism rates and inform judges in parole decisions. Furthermore, machines now have goals, or desired outcomes, of their own and depending on what these goals are, humans might be a good means to achieve those outcomes. The more we build machines to have human-like general intelligence the more likely it seems that machines may move beyond their intended, or original, hardware base to make use of tools to complete their tasks, just as we have. This might not be a bad thing, but one concern is whether us humans will be their tools of choice. Thus, we might need to protect humans from being used, nudged, or manipulated by machines.

Biography

 Karina Vold is a Research Associate at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence and Research Fellow in the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge where she works on the Agency and Personhood Project. She specializes in philosophy of mind and cognitive science and is currently interested in cognitive extension, machine agency, and consciousness.

March, 1st 

13:30

Room 52.223

Phd Seminar : Software development best-practices for reproducible research

By  Alastair Porter

Abstract

In software development it is considered a best practice to test code, include documentation, use source code management tools, and make frequent backups. A lot of the time technical research tends to eschew these best practices, resulting in missing data, hard to reproduce results, and wasted time. For researchers who haven't worked in or studied software engineering roles, it can often be confusing to know where to start, or how these best practices improve code quality and save time. In this talk I will show some examples why software engineering best practices are a valuable part of technical research and how to start applying them if you do not know what tools and resources are available.

March, 1st

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Cyber-physical resilient systems

By Joaquin García-Alfaro

Abstract

Cyber-physical systems consist of upgraded infrastructures in which physical, network and software components interact with each other, in a continuous and dynamic way. This upgrade introduces new threats to the resilience of traditional infrastructures. Known incidents include the sabotage of critical energy facilities, disruption of hospitals and financial services, and successful hacking of navigation systems. The problem is drawing a great deal of attention, since it can have serious effects to businesses, governments and society at large. During this talk, we will focus on disruptive attacks hidden as unintentional component malfunction. Such attacks must be handled by jointly addressing protection at both cyber and physical domains. We will argue about the necessity of novel solutions expanding results from research communities including information security, control theory and automation engineering. Application domains will include industrial scenarios, autonomous vehicles, ambient intelligence and Internet-of-Things.

Biography

Full Professor at Institut Mines-Telecom (Telecom SudParis & Université Paris-Saclay). Double Ph.D.degree in Computer Science from Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) & Université de Rennes. Research Habilitation from Université Pierre et Marie-Curie (Paris Sorbonne VI). He holds two engineering awards from UAB, a doctoral fellowship award and a graduate award from the "la Caixa” savings bank foundation. His research interests are situated in several domains of network & system security, with a special emphasis on areas related to the management of formal policies, analysis of threats, enforcement of mitigation and evaluation of countermeasures.   

February,22nd 

15:30

Room 55.309

Phd Research Seminar

Ethical issues and data protection, CIREP-UPF.

By  Silvia Losa & Josep Blat
 

Abstract

CIREP-UPF (Internal Committee for the Ethical Review of Projects) aims at improving ethical standards and personal data protection in research and academic practices related to human beings, within the UPF community. The first review of a research project by CIREP took place about two years ago.

During this session the basic concepts on both issues, ethics and personal data protection, will be introduced through practical examples. Moreover, it will be discussed how to submit project(s) (proposals) to CIREP for ethics evaluation and approval. The session can be considered as a preparation to submit a proposal on the PhD research and/or acting as a reviewer of such a proposal.

February,22nd 

10:30-12:30

Room 55.309

Course (6 hours: 9th, 15th and 22nd of February)

Phd Seminar : Statistical course and Design of Experiments

By Simone Tassani

The course of statistics aims to introduce a number of tools for master/Ph.D. students and post docs. The presented tools will play a role in planning many kind of studies, properly analyse the results and understand if data analysed by other researchers are or not reliable.

Monofactorial and multifactorial analysis will be presented, together with the definition of Type I and Type II error, multiple comparison errors and tests for multiple comparison.

In the case of multifactorial analysis, the concept of interaction among the factors will also be presented and how to use interaction as estimator of the error in absence of repetitions.

This will lead to the presentation of some examples of Design of Experiment (Latin and Greek-Latin squares) for the reduction of the number of experiments.

February,15th 

15:30

Room 55.410

Phd Research Seminar

Scientific Dissemination, Online Repositories, and Author's Rights

By  Ana Baiges
 

Abstract

The purpose of the meeting is to explain the services that the Library offers to UPF researchers and graduate students in the preparation of scientific publications, and the aspects to take into account in their dissemination. A particular emphasis will be placed on intellectual property issues on the compliance with European and Spanish policies on open access (Horizon 2020, Plan Estatal ICTI) and an overview on author profiles and affiliation.

February,15th 

10:30 - 12:30

Room 55.309

Course (6 hours: 9th, 15th and 22nd of February)

Phd Seminar: Statistical course and Design of Experiments

By Simone Tassani

The course of statistics aims to introduce a number of tools for master/Ph.D. students and post docs. The presented tools will play a role in planning many kind of studies, properly analyse the results and understand if data analysed by other researchers are or not reliable.

The first part of the course will introduce General Linear Modelling and its most common applications:

Linear regression

T-test

F-test

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)

February,9th 

10:30 - 12:30

Room 55.309

Course (6 hours: 9th, 15th and 22nd of February) 

Phd Seminar: Statistical course and Design of Experiments

By Simone Tassani

The course of statistics aims to introduce a number of tools for master/Ph.D. students and post docs. The presented tools will play a role in planning many kind of studies, properly analyse the results and understand if data analysed by other researchers are or not reliable.

The course will start with a brief digression over the several implications that bad statistics have today over the scientific society and why every researcher should know the basic concepts behind a statistical analysis.

February,8th 

15:30

Room 55.410

Phd Research Seminar

Adapting research capabilities to industry

By Aleix Ruiz de Villa.
 
Abstract
Going from academy to industry is not a trivial path. Quite often personal and social expectations do not match entirely. We will share some experiencies about personal and social motivations. We will talk about the relevance of understanding the context before taking decisions. We will introduce how research capabalities may be a key ingredient in industry and finally highlight some fallacies we will possibly find during the process. 
 
Biography
Aleix Ruiz de Villa has a PhD in mathematics and MSc in mathematical finance. He's worked in gaming, traffic software simulation, journalism and retail. He is currently Chief Data Scientist at Onna, a company developing software for documents and knowledge management. He is also cofounder of the Barcelona R Users Group and founder of the Barcelona Grup d'estudi de machine learning meetups.

February,8th 

15:00

Room 55.309

Invited  Research Seminar

Sound Source Localization in Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

By Maximo Cobos

Host: Emilia Gómez

Abstract

With the rapid evolution in the design and manufacture of electronic circuits, wireless nodes that integrate sensors and communication interfaces of different types have become economic resources for the design and deployment of innovative monitoring systems. In this context, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have spread in fields as diverse as security, industry and systems oriented to care and well-being. When nodes incorporate acoustic transducers and the processing involves the manipulation of acoustic signals, such networks are commonly known as wireless acoustic sensor networks (WASNs). Inference of location information has always been an attractive research problem, where traditional (wired) microphone arrays have been employed to identify the number and location of active sound sources. However, practical limiations such as limited processing power, lack of synchronization and battery life of the nodes restrict the direct application of classical approaches within a WASNs framework. The seminar will cover a brief introduction to this research field, as well as an overview of recent approaches to tackle this problem.

Biography

Maximo Cobos received the Ph.D. degree in telecommunications from Universitat Politècnica de València in 2009. His Ph.D. dissertation was awarded with the Ericsson Best Thesis Award on Multimedia Environments from the Spanish National Telecommunications Engineering Association (COIT). He completed with honors his Ph.D studies under the University Faculty Training program (FPU) and was awarded with a "Campus of Excellence" post-doctoral fellowship to work at the Institute of Telecommunications and Multimedia Applications (iTEAM). Since 2011 he has been with the Computer Science Department of the Universitat de València, where he is now an Associate Professor. His work is focused on the area of digital signal processing for audio and multimedia applications, where he has published more than 90 technical papers in international journals and conferences. Dr. Cobos is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a Full Member of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and a member of the Audio Signal Processing Technical Committee of the European Acoustics Association (EAA).

February,8th 

14:30

Room 55.309

Invited  Research Seminar

Multidimensional and multi-level learning of music structure for machine improvisation

by Emmanuel Vicent

Host:Emilia Gómez

Abstract

Current musical improvisation systems generate unidimensional musical sequences by recombining their musical contents. However, considering several dimensions (melody, harmony...) and several temporal levels are difficult issues. In this talk, I will summarize the work of my PhD student Ken Déguernel on the combination of probabilistic approaches with formal language theory in order to address those issues. First, I will present a system able to follow the contextual logic of an improvisation modelled by a factor oracle whilst enriching its musical discourse with multidimensional knowledge represented by interpolated probabilistic models. Then, this work is extended to create another system using a belief propagation algorithm representing the interaction between several musicians, or between several dimensions, in order to generate multidimensional improvisations. Finally, we propose a system able to improvise on a temporal scenario with multi-level information modelled with a hierarchical grammar. We also propose a learning method for the automatic analysis of hierarchical temporal structures. All systems have been evaluated by professional musicians and improvisers during listening sessions.

Biography

Emmanuel Vincent is a Senior Research Scientist with Inria (Nancy, France). He received the Ph.D. degree in music signal processing from IRCAM (Paris, France) in 2004 and worked as a Research Assistant with the Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary, University of London (London, U.K.) from 2004 to 2006. His research focuses on statistical machine learning for audio, with application to source localization and separation and noise-robust speech recognition, among others. He is a founder of the series of Signal Separation Evaluation Campaigns (SiSEC) and CHiME Speech Separation and Recognition Challenges.

February,7th 

12:30

Room 55.410

Invited  Research Seminar

The Face of Emotion: A computational model of the production and visual perception of facial expression of emotion

By  Aleix M. Martinez

Host: Xavier Binefa

Abstract

We now have computer vision algorithms that can successfully detect low-level image features (such as, edges), recover the 3D structure and motion of objects, and provide a semantic label for them (e.g., a face, or John’s face). But how about higher level, abstract concepts like emotions? This talk will introduce the first algorithms to successfully identify the emotion categories people regularly use to communicate emotion. I will first summarize our research uncovering the image features used by the human visual system to recognize emotion in faces. I will then explain how these results can be used to define computer vision systems that can work “in the wild” (i.e., outside controlled, in-lab conditions). In doing so, I will show the novel finding that people regularly use more than 35 distinct facial expressions (not the six propound by Darwin). We will see that the major problem in computer vision is that of landmark detection, not recognition, as is typical of most modern systems.

Biography

Aleix M. Martinez is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The Ohio State University (OSU), where he is the founder and director of the the Computational Biology and Cognitive Science Lab. He is also affiliated with the Department of Biomedical Engineering and to the Center for Cognitive Science where he is a member of the executive committee. Prior to joining OSU, he was affiliated with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Purdue University and with the Sony Computer Science Lab. He has served as an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, IEEE Transaction on Affective Computing, Computer Vision and Image Understanding, and Image and Vision Computing. He has been an area chair for many top conferences and was Program Chair for CVPR 2014 in his hometown, Columbus, OH. He is also a member of the Cognition and Perception study section at NIH and has served as reviewer for numerous NSF, NIH as well as other national and international funding agencies.

February, 1st 

15:30 

Room 55.309

Phd Research Seminar

Communication skills in science: the research in 4 minutes competition

By Aurelio Ruiz
 

Abstract

UPF has launched the "Research in 4 minutes" competition, with the purpose of underscoring the importance of communication skills in the dissemination of science. During this seminar, we will discuss some approaches to maximise the possibilities to succeed in this competition, as well as in any other context with limited time to present your work to non-experts. Suggested reading: Communication: Two minutes to impress.
February, 1st 
12:00
Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Scale-invariant unconstrained online learning

By Wojciech Kotłowski

Abstract

We consider a variant of online convex optimization in which both the instances (input vectors) and the comparator (weight vector) are unconstrained. We exploit a natural scale invariance symmetry in our unconstrained setting: the predictions of the optimal comparator are invariant under any linear transformation of the instances. Our goal is to design online algorithms which also enjoy this property, i.e. are scale-invariant. We start with the case of coordinate-wise invariance, in which the individual coordinates (features) can be arbitrarily rescaled. We give an algorithm, which achieves essentially optimal regret bound in this setup, expressed by means of a coordinate-wise scale-invariant norm of the comparator. We then study general invariance with respect to arbitrary linear transformations. We first give a negative result, showing that no algorithm can achieve a meaningful bound in terms of scale-invariant norm of the comparator in the worst case. Next, we compliment this result with a positive one, providing an algorithm which "almost" achieves the desired bound, incurring only a logarithmic overhead in terms of the norm of the instances.

Biography

Wojciech Kotłowski is an assistant professor at Poznan University of Technology, Poland. From 2009 to 2012, he was a post-doctoral researcher in Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (Amsterdam, Netherlands) in the group of Peter Grünwald. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Poznan University of Technology in 2009 under supervision of Roman Słowiński. His main research interests are in the theory of machine learning, particularly in the online learning withadversarial data.

February, 1st 

10:30

Room 55.309

Research Seminar

Towards Green Web Search

By Ana Freire

Abstract

Web search engines have to deal with a rapid increase of information, demanded by high incoming query traffic. This situation has driven companies to build geographically distributed data centres housing thousands of computers, consuming enormous amounts of electricity and requiring a huge infrastructure around. Google reported the use of 4,400 GWh of electricity (equivalent to the amount of energy consumed by 367 US households). At this scale, even minor efficiency improvements result in large financial savings.

This seminar will introduce the concept of Green Web Search, by first exploring several (still few) approaches for developing sustainable search engines data centres. In the second part of the talk I will focus on a machine-learning-based model for click prediction to reduce the energy consumed while processing queries. Models like this are environmentally and economically beneficial, as they reduce pollution and lead to cost savings.

January 25th

15:30 

Room 55.410

 
Phd Research Seminar
 
Sharing your data and software on Zenodo
 
By Lars Holm Nielsen
 
Abstract
To fully understand and reproduce research performed by others, it is necessary to have all the details. In the digital age, that means all the digital artefacts, which are all welcomed in Zenodo. To be an effective catch-all repository, that eliminates barriers to adopting data sharing practices, Zenodo does not impose any requirements on format, size, access restrictions or licence. Quite literally we wish there to be no reason for researchers not to share! Data, software and other artefacts in support of publications may be the core, but equally welcome are the materials associated with the conferences, projects or the institutions themselves, all of which are necessary to understand the scholarly process.
 
Biography
Lars Holm Nielsen works in the CERN IT Department for the past 6 years where he is Service Manager for Zenodo, a multidisciplinary research data repository for the world, build and operated by CERN. He is also Product Manager for Invenio, the underlying digital repository platform upon which Zenodo is based and has extensive experience in building and managing large scale digital repositories. He previously worked for 10 years at ESO, the European Southern Observatory, working on public outreach information management and science visualization.

January 25th

10:00

Room 55.309

Research Seminar

Learning, inference and control in complex systems

By Vicenç Gómez

Machine Learning is the study of data-driven methods capable of mimicking, understanding and aiding complex information processing tasks. In the first part of this seminar, I will review some of my contributions to this field in two basic research areas: probabilistic graphical models and reinforcement learning. In particular, I will first focus on efficient approximate inference algorithms for estimating the partition function of a graphical model, and second, on the equivalence between probabilistic inference and optimal control computation through the class of linearly-solvable Markov decision processes.

In the second part of this seminar, I will talk about applied research. I will first explain how we can design practical algorithms for robot control using the previous principles. Then, I will show how we can improve brain-computer interfaces using reinforcement learning, and, finally, I will describe how we can better understand online human activity using data-driven methods applied to complex social networks.

Since this research seminar is included in the ML tenure-track evaluation position, I will end up with a brief statement about my future research/academic plans.

January 24th

15:30 

Room 55. 309

PhD Research Seminar

Building Machine Learning Models to Value Heterogeneous Transactions in a Multi-Dimensional Customer-Vendor Relationship

by Gabriel Silberman

Abstract

Customer data​ gathered​ by enterprises is on the rise and being used to understand customer journeys for many purposes.  ​At Cerebri AI we created an approach for using this data, in addition to demographics and other factors, events and transactions, to build supervised and  ​unsupervised machine learning models to ​assess how a customer values a vendor, its products and services ​, at any point in time​ ​.​ The result is something we call Cerebri Values, and they provide a view of the vendor from a customer's perspective.
 
The methodology used to create Cerebri Values enables a proportionate attribution of transactions to events in a customer journey, normalized by the amount of actual purchases and expressed as a monetary value. This allows the detailed design of cost-effective, one-to-one marketing campaigns.
 
The talk will describe the rationale behind Cerebri Values, how they are built and how they are being used in understanding customers in the automotive space. If time allows we will also discuss how a similar approach may be used to detect bias in machine learning models built to support decision making.

January, 18th 

15:30

Room 55.410

PhD Research Seminar

Reproducibility in research.

By Aurelio Ruiz

Abstract

We will use excerpts of the talk by Victoria Stodden at the María de Maeztu Strategic Research Program (available at https://www.upf.edu/web/mdm-dtic/reproducibility-in-research ) to discuss one of the objectives of this program, which is “to increase the impact of our research by increasing the impact of the publications, datasets and software tools, and take advantage of this impact to establish and consolidate partnerships”. We will discuss ways to promote that the research results, datasets and tools are discoverable, interpretable and reusable, including the publication of the data and software together with the publications. During this session, we will discuss some of the topics linked to "reproducible research", including also the increasing external requirements in making datasets and computer code available by funding agencies, publishers and potential mechanisms to promote it in our organisation.

Suggested reading
 

-Reproducible Research in Signal Processing - What, why, and how. Vandewalle, Patrick; Kovacevic, Jelena; Vetterli, Martin. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine (ISSN: 1053-5888), vol. 26, num. 3, p. 37-47. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2009

-Ongoing draft document within MdM for good practices for discussion in this link

-For a survey on NIPS participants and motivations (2008): "The Scientific Method in Practice: Reproducibility in the Computational Sciences", Stodden, Victoria. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4773-10.

Biography

Aurelio Ruiz has a Telecommunications Engineering Degree (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and a Master in Science Management and Leadership (IDEC, UPF). After research and educational traineeships at Technical University Munich, EPFL and CERN, he was responsible for project management in the banking and aeronautical sectors with projects in Europe, Asia and Africa. Since 2006 he is with UPF, currently working in the management of the Maria de Maeztu strategic research program.

January, 18th 

10:00

Room 55.309

Research Seminar

Practical Spectral Learning Algorithms for Compositional Latent State Models

By Ariadna Quattoni

The main topic of this talk will center around the problem of learning compositional latent state models. Many problems in natural language understanding (NLU) can be framed as learning compositional functions over structured input/output domains, for example: language modeling, sequence tagging, parsing, relation extraction, etc. More specifically, I will focus on learning non-deterministic weighted automaton (WFAs) and grammars for these problems.

Spectral learning algorithms for WFAs are based on using a non-parametric representation and exploit a link between recurrence relations satisfied by a function and low-rank constraints on certain matrices constructed from function outputs. They have nice theoretical and algorithmic properties but despite this it has been challenging to obtain competitive results in real language modeling tasks. This is mainly because the classical spectral algorithms have practical limitations that make it hard to scale them to the requirements of real applications. In the first part of the talk I will describe recent work on overcoming some of these limitations that results in significant improvements.

The second part of the talk will be about future research directions. I will touch on another critical aspect of making learning compositional latent state models practical for NLU applications: namely the need for robust active learning algorithms specifically designed for structured domains. Most NLU applications have unique information needs, and obtaining the large collections of annotated data necessary to achieve good performance under the supervised approach might be too expensive for many use-case scenarios. Therefore, we need a collaborative machine learning paradigm that breaks the distinction between annotation and training so that models can be built with a minimal amount of supervision. A key idea that we can borrow from spectral learning is that the problem of active learning of compositional latent state models can be reduced to a form of active low-rank matrix completion.

January, 11th 

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

"How to prepare a good abstract"

By Bart Bijnens

December,14th 

11:30

Room: 52.321

Phd Research Seminar

IEEE Author's Workshop

By Ana Baiges, Federico Peña and Jean Gardy Germain

Services and resources that the UPF Library puts at your disposal for scientific publishing.

Registration Form

December,14th 

11:00

Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Rational data processing in complex networks.

By Santiago Mazuelas

Host: Xavier Binefa

Abstract

Data has been shown to be an extremely useful resource in many fields including communications, information technology, weather forecasting, and economics. Data processing techniques developed under paradigms such as machine learning, data science, and Bayesian inference are enabling many critical applications. In each specific application, data can reduce the uncertainty on the consequences of possible actions and hence improve decision making. For instance, certain key words in an email reduce the uncertainty regarding email usefulness and, hence, improve spam filtering.

Rational decision making that is consistent with preferences among consequences requires a probabilistic processing of data.  Such probabilistic framework for data processing encounters several technical difficulties including 1) modeling of complex data, 2) approximation of intractable computations, and 3) efficiency in high dimensions. In this talk, I will provide an overview of such probabilistic framework and describe techniques to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties. In addition, I will show the practical benefits of the techniques presented through the case study of network localization and navigation.

Keywords: probabilistic processing, machine learning, positioning, distributed processing, information coupling, graphical models, belief propagation, density estimation, Kalman filters, Particle filters, Belief condensation filters

Biography

Santiago Mazuelas has been a Staff Engineer at Qualcomm Corporate Research and Development since Mar 2014. Prior to joining Qualcomm, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow and Associate in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from Sep 2009 to Mar 2014 . He previously worked from 2006 to 2009 as a researcher and project manager in a Spanish technological center as well as a junior lecturer in the University of Valladolid. His general research interest is the application of mathematics to solve engineering problems, currently his work is primarily focused on statistical signal processing, machine learning, and data science.

Dr. Mazuelas is Associate Editor for the IEEE Communications Letters, and has served as Co-chair for the Symposiums on Wireless Communications at the 2014 IEEE Global Communications Conference (Globecom) and at the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC). He has been a member of the Technical Program Committee (TPC) for numerous conferences including the IEEE Globecom in 2010-2017, IEEE ICC in 2013-2017, IEEE VTC in 2012 and 2015, and ICUWB in 2011, and 2013-2017. He received the Best Student Prize in Telecommunications Technical Engineering from University of Valladolid in 2006, the Best Doctorate Thesis Award from University of Valladolid in 2011, and the Young Scientist Prize from the Union Radio-Scientifique Internationale (URSI) Symposium in 2007. His papers received the IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize in 2012, and Best Paper Awards from the IEEE ICC in 2013, the IEEE ICUWB in 2011, and the IEEE Globecom in 2011.

December,12th 

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Creating music at Jukedeck

By Katerina Kosta

Host: Emilia Gómez

Abstract

This presentation starts with an introduction about Jukedeck, an Artificial Intelligence music generation system, its products and aims. Then it focuses on the challenges a music AI system faces in order to create plausible music excerpts; from gathering and cleaning data, learning musical structure, and evaluating the outcome to synthesising audio.

Biography

Katerina Kosta is a machine learning researcher at Jukedeck, working as part of the composition team, whose aim is to develop machine learning systems for music generation. She pursued her PhD at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, conducting research on modelling dynamic variations in expressive music performance. She received degrees from University of Athens (Mathematics) and Filippos Nakas Conservatory, Athens (Piano), and a Sound and Music Computing Masters from the Music Technology Group, UPF, Barcelona.

November,30th 

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Competition policy and consumer outcomes - Assessing the impact of mobile consolidation on innovation and quality

By Xavier Pedrós  

Host: Miquel Oliver

Abstract

Competition authorities are required to assess mergers by looking at the likely effects of these on consumer outcomes. These include a range of characteristics that are important to consumers, such as price, quality and innovation. In practice, however, significant emphasis is put on (often short-term) prices, using tests that can easily trigger competition concerns in investment-intensive industries. Meanwhile, dynamic efficiencies and their possible effects on the quality of mobile services have often faced a strong burden of proof.

This seminar presents the relationship between market structure and consumer outcomes, focusing on the mechanisms by which a more concentrated market can deliver better quality and innovation outcomes. This seminar particularly presents an ex-post assessment of the impact of the 2012 Hutchison/Orange merger on innovation and quality. Using data on 4G networks rollout, download and upload speeds, this work shows that mobile mergers can induce significant dynamic efficiencies and realise direct benefits to consumers. This has relevant implications for competition policy and how quality aspects and efficiencies are taken into account.

Biography

Xavier Pedrós is Economist at GSMA Intelligence. GSMA Intelligence is the analysis and research arm of GSMA, an international organization of mobile operators. Xavier has carried out research in the area of competition and regulatory economics, with a focus on the impact of market structure and competition in mobile markets. He has co-authored a recently published assessment of the impact of mobile mergers on quality and innovation. He has also produced research in the areas of fiscal policy in mobile markets and assessments of the economic impact of mobile telecommunications. Xavier holds a bachelor degree in Political Science at Pompeu Fabra University and a Master´s degree on Economics, with a focus on Industrial Organization and Finance, at Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve.

November,29th 

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

A brief 18 year career in music understanding

By Brian Whitman (formerly co-founder of The Echo Nest, Principal Scientist of Spotify)

Host: Xavier Serra

Abstract

In 1999 I put a somewhat stalled electronic music career on hold to investigate how people were discovering new artists. I was especially interested in how very independent and niche music was getting noticed. Could the new methods of digital distribution at the time allow for greater scale and reach of all types of styles and genres of music? Could natural language processing, signal processing and machine learning play a role in understanding music? Two graduate degrees, a few stints in research labs, a startup, seventy employees, fifty customers, a large acquisition, 150 million active users of our technology and eighteen years later, I've left Spotify to focus on something new. I'm giving a brief talk to discuss what I've learned about the field, how big academic ideas translated into the marketplace, and what could be next. This will be a very informal group discussion.

November,28th 

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Analyzing and Exploiting User-generated Listening Data for Listener Modeling and Music Recommendation

By Markus Schedl (Department of Computational Perception, Johannes Kepler University, Linz )

Host: Xavier Serra 

Abstract

Nowadays, music aficionados generate millions of listening events every day and share them via platforms such as Spotify, Last.fm, or Twitter. In 2016, the LFM-1b dataset (http://www.cp.jku.at/datasets/LFM-1b) containing more than 1 billion listening events of about 120,000 Last.fm users has been released to the research community and interested public. Since then, we performed various data analysis and machine learning tasks on these large amounts of user and listening data. The gained insights helped to develop new listener models and integrate them into music recommender systems, in an effort to increase personalization of the recommendations.
In this talk, I will report on our experiments with the LFM-1b dataset, focusing on the following topics:
- analyzing music taste around the world and clustering on the country level
- quantifying listener and country mainstreaminess
- music recommendation tailored to listener characteristics
- predicting user characteristics from music listening habits
- predicting country-specific genre preferences from cultural and socio-economic factors

November,16th 

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Gender and Science Journal Club

By Irene Torres , Adrián Ponce and Elisa Ruiz 

Host: Aurelio Ruiz

Abstract

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields remain severely underrepresented. For instance, in Spain, women represent about 15% of full (catedras) professorships. Moreover, women are judged to be less competent, receive less payment and research facilities, and are less likely to be awarded research grants compared with male scientists. The different mechanisms leading to this disparity have been investigated and more is brought to light by ongoing research. In this talk we will explain the different challenges faced by women in STEM careers, the reasons and the mechanisms through which they emerge, and changes (big and small) that we can all do to improve the current dire scenario. We will also show how gender, race, class, and sexual identity discriminations are entangled and contribute to leaving out minorities from academia.

November,16th 

15:30

Room 52.s29

Invited Research Seminar

Challenges in Uncertainty Quantification in Medical Image Registration

By Hervé Delingette (INRIA in Sophia Antipolis, Francia)

Host: Miguel Angel Gonzalez Ballester

Abstract

Medical Image Registration is the key ingredient in  many aspects of computer-aided decision medical support systems. For instance it is a standard processing step in many pipelines for medical imaging, abd computer assisted surgery. As such registration would benefit from the development of principled strategies to analyze its output and quantify its uncertainty. In this talk, a generic Bayesian method for non rigid image registration will be presented leading towards an estimation of registration uncertainty. The accuracy of this uncertainty is then evaluated with  an (asymptotically) exact inference scheme based on reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. Challenges for a tractable uncertainty estimation will be reported at this occasion.

November,15th 

15:30

Room 55.410

Invited Research Seminar

The Bioengineering Initiative at Children’s National Health System: Device Development for the Pediatric Environment

By Kevin Cleary (Children's National Medical Centre, Washington DC)

Host: Miguel Angel Gonzalez Ballester

Abstract

This talk will give an overview of work done in the first five years in the Bioengineering Initiative in the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC,
USA. The mission of the Bioengineering Initiative is to serve as an engineering research for the hospital and work with clinical partners to develop technology for minimally invasive interventions. The institute includes scientists, radiologists, and surgeons that are dedicated to improving the precision and decreasing the invasiveness of pediatric procedures.

November,14th 

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Parsing and Grammatical Inference as Constraint Solving

By Dr. Veronica Dahl

Host: Horacio Saggion

Abstract

We describe devised a new, linguistically motivated model of parsing and grammatical inference- the Womb Grammar Model (WGM)-, which allows the application of resources and tools of one language to another, making it possible to study under-resourced languages and dialects, or specialized uses of a same language, e.g., tweeter or SMS (short message service). Our model can particularly help linguists keep up with the rate of grammar discovery needed in our Babel-ish world: just as human wombs can generate any race from an appropriately fertilized egg, our linguistic "womb" can generate, from a language’s known grammar (or from a more abstract, “universal” grammar), the grammar of a different language, given only a set of positive, correct, and representative input sentences of that language, plus its associated lexicon. Our model has received peer validation as a model of parsing and of syntax inference with good semantics integration possibilities. Several experimental implementations  have supported applications to efficient, failure-based parsing, second language tutoring, and language acquisition. Visualization interactions were also studied. A strong proof-of-concept was provided through my student Ife Adebara’s thesis on inferring the grammar of a subset of Yoru`ba ́ noun phrases from that of an English noun phrase grammar. This work demonstrates that the WGM works well even with source languages not closely related to the target.

Biography

Verónica Dahl is an Argentine/Canadian computer scientist who is recognized as one of the 15 founders of the field of logic programming. She has contributed over 100 scientific publications in the fields of computational linguistics, deductive knowledge bases, computational molecular biology and web based virtual worlds. She has received numerous scientific awards-  such as the Calouste Gulbenkian Award for Science and Technology-, and a few literary awards as well. Her greatest ambition is to help bridge the gap between the formal and the humanistic sciences, in the hopes that this will be conducive to an overall more balanced world. She is presently Professor Emeritus at Simon Fraser University. Her research is supported by NSERC.

November,13th 

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Women in AI, Engineering and Computer Science  

By Dr. Veronica Dahl

Host: Aurelio Ruiz

Abstract

Women constitute a majority in the present world, yet are grossly underrepresented in many science. We discuss the societal causes of this curious phenomenon focusing of female underrepresentation in Engineering and in Computing Science -in particular in AI-, from a multicultural perspective. We contrast the specific cases of Argentina, Spain and Canada, trying to shed light upon the causes of female underrepresentation. As well, we discuss possible actions that could heal these causes and could help the integration of women into these fields.

Biography

Verónica Dahl is an Argentine/Canadian computer scientist who is recognized as one of the 15 founders of the field of logic programming. She has contributed over 100 scientific publications in the fields of computational linguistics, deductive knowledge bases, computational molecular biology and web based virtual worlds. She has received numerous scientific awards-  such as the Calouste Gulbenkian Award for Science and Technology-, and a few literary awards as well. Her greatest ambition is to help bridge the gap between the formal and the humanistic sciences, in the hopes that this will be conducive to an overall more balanced world. She is presently Professor Emeritus at Simon Fraser University. Her research is supported by NSERC.

November, 9th 

15:30

Room 54.006

PhD Research Seminar

Mendeley reference manager and research network

By Gemma Álvarez

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

Abstract

During the presentation we will talk about:

Mendeley as a reference manager:

​- How to import your documents and references into your ​own library

​- How to generate citations and bibliographies with MS Word and LibreOffice Plug-ins

Mendeley as a research network:

- Connect and collaborate with researchers

- Your professional researcher profile

IMPORTANT: Previous tasks to do before the session (we recommend you to bring your on laptop. Please fill this form if you plan to attend):

1. Create your Mendeley account.

2. Access the upgraded Mendeley Institutional Edition (MIE) as a UPF's member to get the advantages.

3. Download the Mendeley Desktop version into your device.

November, 9th 

12:30

Auditorium

DTIC-MdM Research Seminar

Open Debate Machine Learning and Human Behaviour

Within the context of the HUMAINT project and the World Science Day for Peace and Development (November 10th), we will have the opportunity to start an open discussion about aspects linked to the relations between technological development and human behaviour, related to  some of the research carried out at our ICT Department.

Program:

  • Introduction by Emilia Gómez and the new JRC project HUMAINT:"machine learning and human behaviour"
  • Vladimir Estivill - Ethical decision making in robots
  • Carlos Castillo - algorithmic bias in machine learning, related to the project awarded by Data Transparency Lab
  • Xavier Serra, cultural bias in computational models, linked to the work at the ERC project CompMusic
  • Open discussion.

Followed by some snacks at the hall of the auditorium to continue discussions (to make an estimation of attendants, please leave your name and surname in this doodle)

October,26th 

15:30

Room 55.410

PhD-MdM Research Seminar

DKPro Core - With Reusable and Interoperable Components Towards Reproducible Experiments

By Dr. Richard Eckart de Castilho

Host: Jens Grivolla

Abstract

Vast amounts of information are stored in unstructured formats such  as audio, video, or plain text. The field of Natural Language Processing (NLP) addresses   this by providing not only methods but also many ready made tools to analyze  text and to structure it in many ways ranginge from simple segmentation to complex  semantic analysis. However, it is often difficult to incorporate these tools into new experimental setups because the complexities of installation, configuration,  data transformation and interoperability in general are often underestimated.  This negatively affects the reproducibility of such experiments.  This talk will give an introduction to doing NLP with DKPro Core and the DKPro   eco-system with a focus on the approaches employed to promote and facilitate   reproducible experiments and the development of NLP-based applications.

Biography

About the speaker: Dr. Richard Eckart de Castilho is a senior research and technical lead at the Ubiquitous Knowledge Processing Lab, TU Darmstadt, the lead developer of DKPro Core,   member of the Apache UIMA project, and maintainer of the Apache uimaFIT library [1].  [1] https://www.ukp.tu-darmstadt.de/people/senior-staff/richard-eckart-de-castilho/

October,25th 

16:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Decoding Neural Drive for New Generation of Neurorehabilitation Systems

By Ivan Vujaklija 

Host: Laura Becerra-Fajardo

Abstract

The generation of a movement is the combination of discrete events (action potentials) generated in the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles. These discrete events, discharged in the various parts of the neuromuscular system, constitute the neural code for movements. Recording and interpretation of this code provides the means for decoding the motor system. Currently we are able to detect and process the available information content only partially and this limitation impedes us to establish widely applicable man-machine interface systems. I will present the developments done within the ERC funded project “DEMOVE”, and recently at the Bioengineering Department at Imperial College London on advanced electrode systems for in-vivo electrophysiological recordings in humans and new computational methods/models for extracting functionally significant information on human movement. The focus of these developments is on providing the link between the cellular mechanisms and the behaviour of the whole motor system in order to establish clinically viable and effective neurorehabilitation technologies.

Biography

Ivan Vujaklija received the engineering degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Belgrade, Serbia, in 2011, and the M.Sc. degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Lübeck, Germany in 2013. He obtained his PhD degree in human medical sciences at the University of Göttingen, Germany in 2016 while working as a research assistant at the Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Germany. From 2012 until 2014 he worked for Ottobock Healthcare GmbH, Duderstadt, Germany, one of the world leading prosthetic manufacturers. In 2014 and 2015 he was a research fellow at Arizona State University and Medical University of Vienna respectively. In 2017 he moved to the Department of Bioengineering at the Imperial College London to work as a research associate. His research interests include bio-signal processing, advanced control algorithms, robotics, translational neurorehabilitation and neural control of movement.

October,19th 

15:30

Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Introduction to PhD Seminars

By Aurelio Ruiz Garcia 

September,14th 

15:30

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Large Research Infrastructures and managing enormous amounts of data: The TOMCAT experience at the Swiss Synchrotron

By Anne Bonnin on behalf of the TOMCAT team

Host Bart Bijnens

 

Abstract

Nowadays, Tomographic Microscopy is a well-known technique used to visualize and study in 3D internal structure and material properties of a variety of samples. Thanks to the photon density reached by third generation synchrotron radiation large-scale facilities, the high-brilliance and high–coherence of synchrotron light enables the detection of micron-sized details in millimetre-sized samples and within few minutes.

The TOMCAT (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experiments) Beamline of the Swiss Light Source offers such unique opportunity, thus providing routinely fast, non-destructive, high resolution, quantitative investigations on a broad kind of materials. With the recent advanced technologies, 3D datasets can even be acquired within seconds involving the acquisition of hundreds of data to cover cm-sized samples. Indeed, the acquisition rate can reach up to 8GB per second of image data. Therefore, the task of collecting, transferring, storing, sharing and analysing such amount of tomographic big data leads to the need of new robust solutions. Within the context of a selected big scale projects, we will present in this talk the current status of the data management from acquisition to storage and the future challenges that X-PCI implies.

 

Biography

Anne Bonnin studied physics and material science at the University Lyon 1. Graduated of a master in theoretical physics and a master in applied physics, she then received her PhD in Physics from the National Institute of Applied Sciences of Lyon (INSA-Lyon, France).

During her PhD, she studied the physical properties of materials in order to discriminate them by means of dual-energy tomography, diffraction and Compton scattering. After graduating with the highest honors, she spent four years in the X-ray imaging group at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France), first in collaboration with the CEA-Cadarache on a project to developed diffraction tomography (XRD-CT) at the ID22Ni beamline (now ID16b) and then on projects in paleontology and material science at the ID19 beamline. In April 2014, she joined the X-ray tomography group at the TOMCAT Beamline (Villigen, Switzerland) to be in charge of the TOMCAT nanoscope development. As local contact, she collaborates with international researchers in material sciences, paleontology and biomedical applications.

Specialized in X-ray imaging (micro and nano-tomography, single-distance phase-retrieval) and powder diffraction (XRD-CT), her research interests focus on the development of new imaging methods to characterize materials and understand their behavior. Finally, she leads the Heart Imaging Project at PSI, which is part of an international collaboration aiming at better describing and understanding the cardiac remodelling processes in rat and human hearts.

September,13th 

15:00

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Machine Listening in Urban/Bio-Acoustic Environments & tools for sustainable MIR research
 

By Justin Salamon

Host Emilia Gomez

Abstract

Internet of Things (IoT) sensor networks, and particularly acoustic sensor networks, open up new opportunities in large-scale, data-driven analyses of acoustic environments. Examples include (but are not limited to) monitoring noise sources in urban environments or monitoring the migration of bird species based on their vocalizations. In both cases, it is necessary to identify and classify specific sound events in an audio signal based on their source, be it jackhammers and car honks or different species of migrating warblers. In this talk I'll present our work on machine listening algorithms for source identification in acoustic environments as part of the Sounds of New York City (SONYC) and BirdVox projects. Finally, I will also give a brief overview of the tools/resources we have been developing for sustainable MIR research including JAMS, mir_eval, Scaper and Massage.

 

Biography

Justin Salamon is a Senior Research Scientist at New York University's Music and Audio Research Lab (MARL) and Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP). He obtained a B.A. (Hons.) in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge, UK, in 2007, and an M.Sc. (2008) and Ph.D. (2013) in Computer Science from the Music Technology Group (MTG) of Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona, Spain, specializing in sound and music computing. He was a visiting researcher at the Sound Analysis-Synthesis research team of the Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique (IRCAM), Paris, France. His research interests include digital signal processing, machine learning and data mining, with applications to machine listening, music information retrieval, bioacoustics and environmental sound analysis. For further information and a full list of publications please see: www.justinsalamon.com

September,7th 

15:00

Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Language Modelling for Automatic Music Transcription

By Andrew McLeod

Host Sergio Oramas

Abstract

Abstract: Automatic music transcription (AMT) is defined as the process of converting an acoustic music signal into some form of human- or machine-readable musical notation. Advances in automatic music transcription performance have been disappointingly slow, with accuracy still falling well below that of human experts at the task. In this presentation, I argue that this problem cannot be sufficiently solved without the use of some sort of music language model, trained on symbolic music data. To that end, I first present an HMM-based voice separation model which works on symbolic music data, both quantized and performed, and also show results of integrating it with an acoustic pitch-detection model for a cappella voice separation from an audio signal. I also discuss work on metrical structure (time signature) detection based on rhythmic analysis using a lexicalized PCFG, arguing that such a grammar can capture the long-range dependencies of musical rhythms. Finally, in future work, I look ahead to the integration of models such as these into a full AMT system with an acoustic model.

 

Biography

Andrew McLeod is a PhD student under the advisement of Mark Steedman at the University of Edinburgh, School of Informatics, Institute for Language, Cognition and Computation (ILCC), set to graduate in early 2018. He received a Bachelors and Masters in Mathematics and Computer Science from Emory University in the USA in 2013. His PhD subject is automatic music transcription, specifically working with symbolic music data to create a music language model based on music theory for the task.

 

Title,  Speaker  and host

Abstract

 

Biography

Invited Research Seminar

July 21st
12:00 hours

Room 55.309 

"Multi-pitch detection and voice assignment for a cappella recordings of multiple singers"

By Rodrigo Schramm

Host: Emilia Gómez

This research focuses on a multi-pitch detection and voice assignment method applied to audio recordings containing a cappella performance with multiple singers. A novel approach combining an acoustic model for multi-pitch detection and a music language model for voice separation and assignment is proposed. The acoustic model is a spectrogram factorization process based on Probabilistic Latent Component Analysis (PLCA), driven by a 6-dimensional dictionary with pre-learned spectral templates. The voice separation component is based on hidden Markov models that use musicological assumptions. By integrating the models, the system can detect multiple concurrent pitches in vocal music and assign each detected pitch to a specific voice corresponding to a voice type such as soprano, alto, tenor or bass (SATB).

 

Rodrigo Schramm received his PhD in Computer Science from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)/Brazil in 2015, where he is currently a faculty member. Between 2013 and 2014, he was visiting fellow at ICCMR - Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research - Plymouth University/UK. In 2016, he was awarded by the Royal Academy of Engineering/UK with the Newton Research Collaboration Programme Award. Currently, he is conducting research at the C4DM (QMUL) in London, focusing his activities on the development of techniques for automatic transcription of audio recordings containing multiple singers.  

 

Invited Research Seminar

 

June, 22nd 2017

16:00

Auditorium

 

Intrinsic Coupling Modes and Cognition

by Prof. Dr. Andreas K. Engel

Hosted by: Gustavo Deco

Intrinsic coupling constitutes a key feature of ongoing brain activity, which exhibits rich spatiotemporal patterning and contains information that influences cognitive processing. I will discuss evidence for two distinct types of intrinsic coupling modes which seem to reflect the operation of different coupling mechanisms. One type arises from phase coupling of band-limited oscillatory signals, whereas the other results from coupled aperiodic fluctuations of signal envelopes. The two coupling modes differ in their dynamics, their origins, their putative functions and with respect to their alteration in neuropsychiatric disorders. I will propose that the concept of intrinsic coupling modes can provide a framework for capturing the dynamics of intrinsically generated neuronal interactions at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

Andreas K. Engel studied medicine and philosophy at Saarland University, Homburg, at the Technical University of Munich, and at the Goethe University Frankfurt in Germany. Having completed his medical exams, he obtained his doctorate (Dr. med.) from the Technical University Munich in 1987. Between 1987-1995 he worked as a post-doctoral fellow with Wolf Singer at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany. From 1996-2000, Engel headed a research group at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research which was funded by the Heisenberg Program of the German Research Foundation (DFG). Between fall 1997 and summer 1998, he also was affiliated as a Daimler-Benz Fellow to the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study. From 2000-2002, he worked at the Jülich Research Centre as head of the Cellular Neurobiology Group at the Institute for Medicine. In 2002, he was appointed to the Chair of Neurophysiology at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Engel is a member of the Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg. Since 2011, he is the coordinator of Collaborative Research Centre SFB 936 „Multi-Site Communication in the Brain“ (with C. Gerloff, Dept. of Neurology, UKE). In 2011, Engel received an ERC Advanced Grant (with P. König, University of Osnabrück, Germany).

Phd Seminar

June, 20th 2017

11:00- 55.309

Statistical course and Design of Experiments

by Simone Tassani

The course (6 hours: 30 of May, 6 and 20 of June, 11h - 13h) will cover General Linear Models, Management of Error and introduction to Design of Experiment. Dr. Simone Tassani is senior researcher of the Multiscale and Computational Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (MBIOMM) team in the SIMBiosys group  

Invited Research Seminar

June, 19th 2017

12:00

55.410

Computational modeling of musculoskeletal functional anatomy from medical images and cadaver data

by Yoshinobu Sato

Hosted by: Miguel A. González Ballester

Due to increasing interest to healthy life expectancy, the significance of the musculoskeletal system is recognized more than before. In addition to medicine, musculoskeletal anatomy is related to sports science, art, computer graphics and so on. In this talk, computational modeling of functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal system is presented, which is under development in the “Multidisciplinary Computational Anatomy” project conducted by multi-institutional collaboration in Japan. The models consist of mathematical and statistical models on bone-muscle relations, muscle fibers, bone orientations at the standing position, articular motions, and bone micro-structure from the aspect of function, as well as deformations due to osteoarthritis from the aspect of pathology. This model is constructed from clinical CT data and other modality data, including micro-CT, histology, X-ray, ultrasound images, in addition to 3D measurement data obtained from cadaver experiments. Fundamental technologies for representation and construction of the model are presented and its applications to segmentation, muscle fiber modeling, and computer-aided diagnosis and therapy are overviewed. Yoshinobu Sato received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D degrees in Information and Computer Sciences from Osaka University, Japan in 1982, 1984, 1988, respectively. From 1988 to 1992, he was working at the NTT Human Interface Laboratories. In 1992, he joined Osaka University Medical School. From 1996 to 1997, he was a Research Fellow at the Surgical Planning Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. From 2014, he is a Professor of Information Science at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Japan. Dr. Sato was Program Chair of MICCAI 2013. He is an editorial board member of Medical Image Analysis journal and International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery.

PhD  Research Seminar

June, 15th 2017

12:30 h

55.410

Ethical issues and data protection, session 2 CIREP-UPF

Speaker: Silvia Losa & Josep Blat

Host: Aurelio Ruiz

CIREP-UPF (Internal Committee for the Ethical Review of Projects) aims at improving ethical standards and personal data protection in research and academic practices related to human beings, within the UPF community. The first review of a research project by CIREP took place about a year ago.

During this session, we will review the ethical process and the information provided already by stsudents, analysing their content

 

Invited Research Seminar

June, 15th 2017

12:30 h

55.410

Generative Models of Drawing and Sound

Speaker: Douglas Eck

Hosted by: Xavier Serra

I'll give an overview talk about Magenta, a project investigating music and art generation using deep learning and reinforcement learning. I'll discuss some of the goals of Magenta and how it fits into the general trend of AI moving into our daily lives. I'll talk about two specific recent projects. First I'll discuss our research on Teaching Machines to Draw with SketchRNN, a LSTM recurrent neural network able to construct stroke-based drawings of common objects. SketchRNN is trained on thousands of crude human-drawn images representing hundreds of classes. Second I'll talk about NSynth, a deep neural network that learns to make new musical instruments via a WaveNet-style temporal autoencoder. Trained on hundreds of thousands of musical notes, the model learns to generalize in the space of musical timbres, allowing musicians to explore new sonic spaces such as sounds that exist somewhere between a bass guitar and a flute. This will be a high-level overview talk with no need for prior knowledge of machine learning models such as LSTM or WaveNet. Doug is a Research Scientist at Google leading Magenta, a Google Brain project working to generate music, video, image and text using deep learning and reinforcement learning. A main goal of Magenta is to better understanding how AI can enable artists and musicians to express themselves in innovative new ways. Before Magenta, Doug led the Google Play Music search and recommendation team. From 2003 to 2010 Doug was an Associate Professor in Computer Science at the University of Montreal's MILA Machine Learning lab, where he worked on expressive music performance and automatic tagging of music audio.

Invited Research Seminar

June, 8th 2017

15:30 h

55.309

Neural mechanisms of sensor

Speaker: Tatiana Pasternak, Ph.D.  

Host: Rubén Moreno Bote

To perform a ubiquitous task of comparing sensory stimuli across time and/or space, subjects must identify these stimuli, retain them in memory and retrieve them at the time of comparison. Thus, the neuronal circuitry underlying such tasks must involve cortical regions sub-serving sensory processing, maintenance, attention and decision-making. In our work, we have been examining the neural substrates of memory-guided comparisons of visual motion, with the focus on two reciprocally interconnected regions, the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and the motion processing area MT. We have characterized the activity in both areas during motion comparison tasks, identifying signals in the LPFC likely to represent bottom-up motion information supplied by MT and signals in area MT likely to represent the top-down influences from the LPFC. I will discuss the evidence that the content of task-related activity in MT and LPFC is a product of continuous interactions between neurons in the two areas during which they process and exchange signals generated during all stages of memory-guided sensory comparisons.

My current research at the Department of Neuroscience of the University of Rochester is focused on the mechanisms underlying processing and storage of visual motion information in primate cortex. In our studies we combine single cell recordings, microstimulation, reversible inactivation with psychophysical measures of visual performance. We have shown that neurons in visual cortical area MT, strongly associated with processing of visual motion, also participate in the storage and the retrieval/comparison operations required by working memory tasks.

 

Phd Seminar

June, 6th 2017

11:00 - 55.309

Statistical course and Design of Experiments

by Simone Tassani

The course (6 hours: 30 of May, 6 and 20 of June, 11h - 13h) will cover General Linear Models, Management of Error and introduction to Design of Experiment. Dr. Simone Tassani is senior researcher of the Multiscale and Computational Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (MBIOMM) team in the SIMBiosys group  

Invited Research Seminar

June, 1st

15:30 h

55.309

The portability of Learning Analytics applications and learning designs

By Dai Griffiths

Hosted by: Davinia Hernández-Leo

The desire to leverage the data generated during educational activities is observable in most areas of education, and in many countries. Much of the most interesting work along this line goes under the banner of ‘learning analytics’. However, this work is often carried out in isolation, in individual institutions, or, sometimes, in individual ministries of education. There are many potential benefits to sharing this work, so that the infrastructure for learning analytics, and learning designs which it makes possible, can be deployed in different place. But this is more complex than it might appear. In this seminar I will explore three aspects of this problem.

1) Technical issues. There is substantial activity around technical specifications for representing learning activities, focused around Caliper (from IMS), and xAPI (from ADL). Nevertheless, a lot of work remains to be done. I will report briefly on work being done by Jisc in the UK to create an open learning analytics platform, and to develop data collection methods for UK higher education institutions.

2) A clash of approaches to ethics and privacy. Learning Analytics can be seen from the perspectives of both operations research and academic research. The two traditions have contrasting approaches to ethics and data governance, with differing resolutions in different places.

3) A number of wider policies regarding educational content, management and finance have an impact on the success or failure of learning analytics in different contexts.

I propose that unless we pay attention to the social and regulatory aspects of learning analytics, we may misunderstand the reasons why applications are successful or not, and are unlikely to be successful in transferring applications from one context to another. 

Dai Griffiths is a professor in the School of Education and Psychology at the University of Bolton. His background is in the arts and in education, and he has taught at many levels including primary and secondary education, higher education and continuing education, and in industry. From the early 1990s he worked on a wide range of aspects of technology and education, as a developer, researcher and project manager, before taking on his current role. He has published extensively on the design of learning activities and their technological support, and on adaptive learning with IMS Learning Design. This led to his current engagement with learning analytics, through Cetis, leadership of the Bolton contribution to the LACE project, and work on the Jisc xAPI profiles.

Phd Seminar

May, 30th 2017

11:00

55.309

Statistical course and Design of Experiments

by Simone Tassani

The course (6 hours: 30 of May, 6 and 20 of June, 11h - 13h) will cover General Linear Models, Management of Error and introduction to Design of Experiment.  Dr. Simone Tassani is senior researcher of the Multiscale and Computational Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (MBIOMM) team in the SIMBiosys group

Invited Research Seminar

May 29th, 2017

16:00

55.309

Basis models of musical expression for creating and explaining music performances

by Maarten Grachten
Hosted by: Emília Gómez
Expression in music performance is an important aspect of score-based music traditions such as Western classical music: Music performed by skilled musicians can be captivating as much as an improper performance can put listeners off.  Computational modeling of expression in music performance is a challenging and ongoing effort, aiming both at a better understanding of the underlying principles, and at novel applications in music technology. In this talk, we will present a recently proposed modeling framework for musical expression, utilizing basis-function representations of score information. We show how it can be used for predictive modeling---to generate an expressive performance of a musical score---as well as for explanatory purposes. We illustrate this framework both in the context of solo piano music and in classical symphonic music. Maarten Grachten holds a Ph.D. degree in computer science and digital communication (2006, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain). He is a former member of the Artificial Intelligence Research Institute (IIIA, Spain), the Music Technology Group (MTG, Spain), the Institute for Psychoacoustics and Electronic Music (Belgium), and the Austrian Research Institute for Artificial Intelligence (OFAI, Austria). Currently, he is a senior researcher at the Department of Computational Perception (Johannes Kepler University, Austria). Grachten has published in and reviewed for numerous international journals and conferences, on topics related to machine learning, music information retrieval, affective computing, music cognition, and computational musicology. His current research focuses on computational modeling of musical expectation and expressive performance.

Invited Research Seminar

May 29th, 2017

15:30

55.309

Movement Sound Interaction: from creative applications to rehabilitation

by Frederic Bevilacqua
 
Hosted by: Emília Gómez
I will present an overview of the research we have been conducting at IRCAM on gesture capture and analysis. We have been collaborating with various composers, performers, which allows us to develop important concept and paradigms for the development of musical interactive systems. For examples, we have developed various augmented instruments by adding motion-capture systems to acoustic instruments such the violin. This allows us to study instrumental gestures and develop software for following/recognising gestures. We have also developed specific tangible interfaces such as the MO - Modular Musical Objects, or more recently the RIoT that allows for interacting with digital sound environments. Finally, we will present some recent studies and applications related to sensori-motor learning and embodied music cognition.
Frédéric Bevilacqua is the head of the Sound Music Movement Interaction team at IRCAM in Paris His research concerns the modeling and the design of interaction between movement and sound, and the development of gesture-based interactive systems.

Invited Research Seminar 

May 26th, 2017

16:00

55.410

What makes hue special?

by Ivar Farup

Hosted by: Marcelo Bertalmio

When Riemann presented his non-Euclidean geometry in 1854, he suggested that 'the only simple notions whose specializations form a multiply extended manifoldness are the positions of perceived objects and colours'. For more than a century following his discovery, various non-Euclidean colour geometries were developed by Helmholtz, Schrödinger, MacAdam, Silberstein, Stiles and others, mainly for the accurate computation of perceptual colour metrics. From a colour order perspective, it was observed by Judd in the 1940-ies that the human visual system is more sensitive to changes in colour hue than to changes in lightness and chroma – a phenomenon he denoted 'hue super-importance'. This indicates a negative curvature of colour space. Resnikoff demonstrated from an axiomatic point of view in 1974 that the colour space must be either Euclidean or hyperbolic, i.e., negatively curved. Despite these indications from diametrically opposite approaches, Euclidean colour spaces have been of almost unique and undisputed use in colour image processing for the last decades. For applications such as gamut mapping and HDR image rendering, artificial tricks have been introduced in the algorithms in order to prevent unacceptable hue changes. In this talk, I will discuss this issue, and propose a direction for a different way to deal with the hue in colour image processing.

Ivar Farup is a professor of computer science and study program leader for bachelor in engineering – computer science at NTNU in Gjøvik. He holds a MsC in theoretical physics form NTH (Norway) in 1994, and a PhD in mathematics from University of Oslo in 2000. His research interests lie are colour science and image processing.

Invited Research Seminar

May 23rd, 2017

15:30

Room 55.309

Microscopic crowd modeling and simulation: an holistic approach

Speaker: Julien Pettre 

Host: Josep Blat

Crowd simulation allows to reproduce, predict or understand collective human motions. It has application in various field, such as architecture, urban design or computer animation. Many simulation algorithms were proposed to simulate crowds. How do they work? How they were designed? In this talk, we will describe our efforts in the observation of human crowds to understand how individuals behave in such a context, as well as the basic principles of crowd simulation. More especially, we will describe velocity-based simulation models, and some of their variants.  Julien Pettré is research scientist at Inria in Rennes, member of the Lagadic team. He obtained a Ph.D. in robotics in 2003 from the University of Toulouse, he spent a postdoctoral stay at EPFL, before joining Inria in 2006. His research interests include robotics, computer animation, virtual reality, crowd simulation, motion planning, and human motion simulation. 
May

Integrative Research Seminar

Wed
April 26th, 2017
12:30
Auditorium

Synthesizing consciousness: science, technology and society

by Paul F.M.J. Verschure

Understanding the nature of consciousness is one of the grand outstanding scientific challenges of great importance both to understand who we are and of significant practical value. The fundamental methodological problem is how phenomenal first person experience can be accounted for in a third person verifiable form, while the conceptual challenge is to both define its function and physical realization. The Distributed Adaptive Control theory of consciousness (DACtoc) proposes answers to these three challenges that will be presented in this talk. I will highlight some of the functional and mechanistic aspects of DACtoc showing how DACtoc has informed our understanding of core brain mechanisms of perception, cognition and action and given rise to one of the most effective neurorehabilitation method available today. An important consequence of DACtoc is that if we aim to build socially capable machines they must become conscious raising further important questions on how we can co-exist with them.

I will also give a short overview of the history of SPECS at DTIC covering 2006-2017 and explain why we are now planning a move to IBEC.

References:

1.         Verschure, P.F.M.J., Synthetic consciousness: the distributed adaptive control perspective. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2016.371.                              

Paul F.M.J. Verschure

PhD Research Seminar

April 25th

10:30

Room 55.309

Design for creative play (Thanks to U.S. Consulate General in Barcelona, in the context of the cooperation for the American Space)

Speaker: Eric Rosenbaum
Hosted by: Aurelio Ruiz

Eric Rosenbaum will describe some of the works he has been working on recently, including live demos for some of them, and will establish a discussion with PhD students around the challenges in achieving sustainable social impact from research activities.

 

   

Scratch Team at MIT Media Lab. Co-inventor of Makey Makey.

I design for creative play. My tools are all about bringing your imagination to life by helping you make things you care about. I love to see how using my tools can transform people's sense of what they can make and who they can become.

I am currently working with the Scratch Team at MIT Media Lab. I have also recently worked with Google Creative Lab and NYU Music Experience Design Lab. In 2015, I completed my PhD at MIT Media Lab in the Lifelong Kindergarten group with a dissertation entitled "Explorations in Musical Tinkering." Before my time at the Media Lab, I worked at MIT Teacher Education Program, creating learning games; Concord Consortium, creating molecular dynamics simulations for kids; and Six Red Marbles, creating animations for music education. I hold a Master's in Technology in Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Bachelor's in Psychology and Mind/Brain/Behavior from Harvard College. 

I enjoy playing the trombone with the Opposite People.  

Invited Research Seminar

April 20th

15:30

Room 55.309

Considerations about space in acousmatic music. Expanding ideas into multichannel formats

Speaker: Daniel Schachter
Hosted by: Andres Lewin

The relation between sound and space has always been a central concern for composers of acousmatic music and spatial distribution is undoubtedly a part of the conception of musical works. In this way, composers have at their disposal the possibility of defining which will be the final concert format for each of their compositions.  On the other hand technological advances allow the listener to access and choose more than one way of listening to music and in recent years the installation of multichannel audio home systems has become more and more usual, while the concert venues have incorporated multichannel options as a standard for the concert.

However, stereo remains as the most widely used format for CD distribution as well as for radio broadcasting.  This situation is undoubtedly decisive for the composer’s perspective. In fact, composers in some cases think their music in stereo and afterwards need to extended their thought into 6 or 8 channels for the concert, or on the contrary they may originally think their sound discourse in multiple channels with the concert in mind, and after that are forced to think on a stereo reduction for recording and broadcasting.  This talk will propose some compositional strategies, considering that the multichannel expansion of an original stereo can have similar textural characteristics that the orchestration in traditional instrumental music, and that the stereo reduction of a multichannel original may also be compared with the piano reduction of orchestral pieces.  This approach does not rule out the use of computer applications, but takes more into account the textural characteristics of musical works in order to face expansion and/or reduction. 

Later on Concert in Sala Polivalente at 19:30

http://phonos.upf.edu

Composer and researcher, born in Buenos Aires in 1953. Professor at the National University of Lanús (UNLa, Argentina) where he is also director of the UNLa’s Research Centre for Sonic and Audiovisual Arts (CEPSA). He taught electroacoustic composition at the Julian Aguirre Conservatory in Buenos Aires for almost 20 years and established the conservatory’s Electroacoustic Studio. He is a founder and Board Member of the RedASLA (Network for Latinamerican Sonic Arts) created in Santiago, Chile (2005). 

 

PhD Research Seminar

April 6th

15:30

Room 55.309

Communication skills in science: the research in 4 minutes competition


Speaker: Aurelio Ruiz

UPF has launched the "Research in 4 minutes" competition, with the purpose of underscoring the importance of communication skills in the dissemination of science. During this seminar, we will discuss some approaches to maximise the possibilities to succeed in this competition, as well as in any other context with limited time to present your work to non-experts. Suggested reading: Communication: Two minutes to impress .Aurelio Ruiz has a Telecommunications Engineering Degree (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and a Master in Science Management and Leadership (IDEC, UPF). After research and educational traineeships at Technical University Munich, EPFL and CERN, he was responsible for project management in the banking and aeronautical sectors with projects in Europe, Asia and Africa. Since 2006 he is with UPF, having worked at the Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine Research Group, within the UPF Research Services as the Promotion Officer of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies and the associated Polytechnic School and currently, in the coordination of the María de Maeztu Research Program.
April

Integrative  Research Seminar

March 30th

12:30

Auditorium

Technology-enhanced music learning, health and well-being 

Speaker: Rafael Ramirez

 

Learning to play a musical instrument has been showed to provide several benefits for acquiring non-musical skills. However, there is a lack of generalised access to music education, and musical instrument learning is mostly based on the master-apprentice model in which the student’s interaction and socialization is often restricted to short and punctual contact with the teacher followed by long periods of self-study resulting in high abandonment rates. In such scenario, modern technologies are rarely employed and almost never go beyond audio and video recording. Our research aims to study how we learn musical instruments from a pedagogical and scientific perspective in order to create new interactive, assistive, self-learning, augmented-feedback, and social-aware systems complementary to traditional teaching. The aim is to allow more people to have access to music education, including people with motor disabilities, and reduce abandonment rates among music students. In this seminar, I will take the opportunity to present some of the research carried out in our research lab on areas such as technology-enhanced music learning, expressive performance modelling, accessible music interfaces, as well as some applications to health and well-being.

Dr. Rafael Ramirez is a Tenured Associate Professor and Leader of the Music and Machine Learning Lab at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona. He obtained his BSc in Mathematics form the National Autonomous University of Mexico, and his MSc in Artificial Intelligence and PhD in Computer Science from the University of Bristol, UK. For five years, Rafael was a Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at the School of Computing of the National University of Singapore. He is currently principal investigator in the H2020 Research and Innovation TELMI (Technology-Enhanced Learning of Music Instruments) project. His research interests include music technology, machine learning, data mining, and their application to cognition, creative processes, accessible and brain-computer Interfaces, and health and well-being. He has published more than 100 research articles in peer-reviewed international Journals and Conferences, and acted as guest-editor of several special issues focused on machine learning and music. He currently acts as chair and program committee member for several machine learning and music technology conferences.

PhD Research Seminar

March 30th

15:30

Room 54.003

Mendeley reference manager and research network

Speaker: Gemma Álvarez

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

During the presentation we will talk about:

Mendeley as a reference manager:

​- How to import your documents and references into your ​own library

​- How to generate citations and bibliographies with MS Word and LibreOffice Plug-ins

Mendeley as a research network: 

- Connect and collaborate with researchers

- Your professional researcher profile

IMPORTANT: Previous tasks to do before the session (we recommend you to bring your on laptop. Please fill this form if you plan to attend):

1. Create your Mendeley account.

2. Access the upgraded Mendeley Institutional Edition (MIE) as a UPF's member to get the advantages.

3. Download the Mendeley Desktop version into your device.

UPF Library

Invited Research Seminar

March 29th

11:00

Room 55.410

Style aware tone retargeting

Speaker: Rèmi Cozot 

Host:  Marcelo Bertalmío

The last trend in displays and TV is High Dynamic Range technologies, which provide high range of contrast. On the one hand, the vast majority of video content existing today is in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) format and there is a strong interest in upscaling this content for High Dynamic Range (HDR) displays. This retargeting processing is called Tone Expansion (or Inverse Tone Mapping). On the other hand, HDR content must be downscaled to SDR format in order to be displayed on SDR displays. This processing is called Tone Mapping.  After a short introduction that presents the key elements related to lighting styles or aesthetics, we show that current Tone Expansion and Tone Mapping operators do not perform as well when dealing with content of various lighting styles/aesthetics. Then we propose a Tone Expansion method that adapts to the style of the video and ensure the lighting style fidelity.  Concerning Tone Mapping operators, many solutions have been designed for still images over the last decade; only few of them can cope with video sequences. Indeed, these operators tone map each frame of a video sequence separately, which results in the lost of the lighting style of the HDR content. We propose a method that aims at preserving lighting style (more especially temporal brightness coherency) when tone mapping video sequences.
 
Rémi Cozot (born 1968, France) is associate professor at the University of Rennes 1 and member of the IRISA Laboratory. He received his Ph.D and Habilitation to conduct researches respectively in 1996 and 2014. His main research topic concerns the preservation of a user’s intent when editing real or computer generated contents. This topic involves many scientific skills such as visual human perception, image and video analysis, computer graphics. He has been involved in HDR imagery since 2007 and participated in many French and European projects on HDR imaging. He is co-author of the chapter “video tone mapping” of the book entitled “High Dynamic Range Video - From Acquisition, to Display and Applications”.

Invited Research Seminar

March 28th

15:30

Room 55.309

Towards perceptually realistic visual experience

Speaker: Rafal Mantiuk

Host:  Marcelo Bertalmío

Today's computer graphics techniques make it possible to create imagery that is hardly distinguishable from photographs. However, a photograph is clearly no match to an actual real-world scene. I argue that the next big challenge is to achieve perceptual realism by creating artificial imagery that would be hard to distinguish from reality. This requires profound changes in the entire imaging pipeline, from acquisition and rendering to display, with the strong focus on visual perception.
 
The technical limitations of display technologies make it very hard to deliver perceptually realistic images. However, we can get much closer to that goal by a technique that involves optimization of perceptual match between real-world visual content and the rendition of that content on a display. Given the limitations of a display and a model of visual system, we can render images which are the closest match to the real-world experience. I will demonstrate such an approach on an example modeling night vision, in which we can simulate night vision or compensate for its limitations. The method can be used in games, driving simulators, or as a compensation for displays used under varying ambient light levels.
 
Rafal K. Mantiuk is a senior lecturer at the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge (UK). He received PhD from the Max-Planck-Institute for Computer Science (Germany). His recent interests focus on designing imaging algorithms that adapt to human visual performance and viewing conditions in order to deliver the best images given limited resources, such as computation time, bandwidth or dynamic range. He contributed to early work on high dynamic range imaging, including quality metrics (HDR-VDP), video compression and tone-mapping. More on his research can be found at: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rkm38/.

Invited Research Seminar

March 17th

15:30

Room 55.309

Spectral Learning of Natural Language Structure

Speaker: Xavier Carreras

Compositional structures abound in natural language, ranging from dependency relations between words, to entities in context, to sequences and trees that encode the linguistic structure of textual content.  The focus of this talk is in latent-variable compositional models of natural language structure that: (1) induce a latent n-dimensional representation for each element of the structure; and (2) learn operators for composing such elements into structures.
 
I will present the framework of spectral learning, that reduces the problem of learning compositional models to low-rank matrix learning.  I will then present some of my contributions on using spectral learning for various NLP problems. First, I will show that low-rank learning of compositional models benefits generalization to unseen structures, and I will present experiments on named entity extraction and syntactic parsing. Then I will move to the problem of learning weighted automata and grammars. In this setting, the key ingredient for spectral learning are Hankel matrices, which are matrices that capture the recurrence relations behind compositional models of language. I will show how various objectives can be formulated, including unsupervised learning of context-free grammars from strings of the language alone.
Xavier Carreras is a research scientist at Xerox Research Centre Europe since 2014. Xavier has a degree in Computer Science (2000) and a Ph.D. (2005) from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC). From 2006 to 2009 he was a postdoc at MIT. From 2009 to 2014 he was research scientist at the UPC under the Ramon y Cajal program. 
 
His research interests are in the areas of Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning, with special interests in structured prediction problems in NLP, parsing methods, information extraction, machine translation, and dialogue systems. More recently he became interested in spectral learning methods for weighted automata and grammars, and their application to NLP problems. Xavier has published in the top-tier conferences and journals of the area, including ACL, TACL, EMNLP, CoNLL, COLING on the NLP side, and JMLR, ML, ICML, ECML, NIPS and AISTATS on the Machine Learning side. He got the best paper awards at CoNLL 2008 and EACL 2012.
 
Xavier was program co-chair of EMNLP 2016 and CoNLL 2009, and over the last 10+ years he has served regularly in the program committees of all major conferences. From 2011 to 2016, he was officer of SIGNLL, the special interest group of the ACL that organizes CoNLL. He has been invited lecturer at all the editions of the Lisbon Machine Learning Summer School (LxMLS), from 2011 to 2017. At UPC, he led the research team of the EU project XLike, on cross-lingual knowledge extraction. At Xerox Research, he has been involved in developing robust NLP tools for dialogue systems, focusing on quick adaptation to new tasks and textual domains.

Invited Research Seminar

March 16th

15:30

Room 55.410

Cardiac Modelling and Imaging Biomarkers

Speaker: Pablo Lamata

This talk presents specific steps in the journey towards the paradigm of an in-silico medicine, where healthcare is informed by computational models that (1) formulate our knowledge of cardiac physiology and physics, and that (2) integrate all the clinical data available of a patient into a cohesive picture. I will focus on the provision of a better management of cardiovascular diseases based on the interpretation of clinical data through the lenses of a computational model. The overarching hypothesis is that the process of model personalization reveals biomarkers with additional diagnostic and prognostic value. I will present examples of how models can better stratify anatomical remodelling, extract non-invasive central blood pressure, or characterise diastolic performance. I will finally discuss the opportunities in the mismatch between data and models, the potential synergies between mechanistic and statistical approaches, and the management of expectations towards the clinical translation. Dr. Pablo Lamata – Lecturer and Sir Henry Dale Fellow. http://cmib.website

PhD Research Seminar

March 16th

12:30

Room: 52.427

Software development best-practices for research reproduceability 

Speaker: Alastair Porter

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

In software development it is considered a best practice to test code, include documentation, use source code management tools, and make frequent backups.
A lot of the time technical research tends to eschew these best practices, resulting in missing data, hard to reproduce results, and wasted time.
For researchers who haven't worked in or studied software engineering roles, it can often be confusing to know where to start, or how these best practices improve code quality and save time.
In this talk I will show some examples why software engineering best practices are a valuable part of technical research and how to start applying them if you do not know what tools and resources are available.
Alastair Porter received his Masters in Music Technology from McGill University in 2013. Since then he has been a researcher and developer in the Music Technology Group at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra. He is an active member of a number of open source communities, including the MusicBrainz project, an open database of information about music and musicians, both as a data contributor and a developer. As part of the CompMusic project he developed a software infrastructure for use by all of the researchers involved in the CompMusic project, as well as a web application used by thousands of users. In 2014 he helped to launch the AcousticBrainz project, which consists of a large software application built by many developers spread around the world, and used by thousands of other contributors.

Invited Research Seminar

March 15th

15:30

Room 55.309

Big Crisis Data - Social Media in Disasters and Time-Critical Situations

Speaker: Carlos Castillo

Social media is an invaluable source of time-critical information during a crisis. However, emergency response and humanitarian relief organizations that would like to use this information struggle with an avalanche of social media messages that exceeds human capacity to process. This talk focuses on the context, the methods, and the systems that are  used for processing social media messages under time-critical constraints. Carlos Castillo is Director of Research for Data Science at Eurecat. He is a web miner with a background on information retrieval, and has been influential in the areas of web content quality and credibility, and adversarial web search. He is a prolific researcher with more than 75 publications in top-tier international conferences and journals, receiving 9300+ citations. His works include a recent book on Big Crisis Data (http://bigcrisisdata.org/), as well as monographs on Information and Influence Propagation, and Adversarial Web Search.

Invited Research Seminar

March 10th

12:00

Room 55.309

Some Advances in Electrical Impedance Tomography and in Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

Speaker: Mariano Fernández-Corazza

Host: Federico Sukno

Using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) it is possible to estimate the electrical conductivity of the head tissues. In EIT, an electric current is injected on the boundary (the scalp) and the resulting electric potential is measured with an electrode array. There are two typical uses of EIT, either to reconstruct the conductivity distribution or map (reconstruction EIT), or to estimate a few conductivity values (parametric EIT). The parametric EIT or bounded EIT can be used to estimate the electrical conductivity values of the head tissues. In this line, and using parametric EIT from real measurements in humans, I’ll show that the there is an overestimation of the typical skull conductivity reported and widely-used in the literature. Reconstruction EIT can be used as a diagnostic tool, for example, to detect and map an acute stroke within a few hours from the stroke onset. In this line, we proposed the use of spatial filter techniques. I’ll show successful tests in phantoms and the results of ongoing tests in animals. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), is a set of therapeutic techniques that can modify cortical excitability as well as brain rhythms and networks by applying an electric current on the scalp. Its potential applications include the treatment of epilepsy, dementia, anxiety, and stroke rehabilitation. Its main advantage is that the electric current can be redirected to a particular region of interest (ROI) of the brain without affecting the whole brain as psychoactive drugs do. We work in the mathematical problem of determining current injection patterns given a ROI and safety constraints. In particular, I’ll show the optimal solutions based on the reciprocity principle. Mariano Fernández-Corazza is a Professor at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, where he received his Eng. (2007) and PhD (2015) degrees. He holds a post-doctoral fellowship of the Argentinian Research Council (CONICET). His doctoral and postdoctoral experiences include research visits to the NeuroInformatcis Center at the University of Oregon and the Electrical Geodesics Inc. Company, both located in Eugene, Oregon, US (2014, 2015, 2016). His research interests include statistical signal processing, adaptive spatial filters and electrical modeling of the human head applied to the forward and inverse problems in Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), transcranial Direct current Stimulation (tDCS), and Electroencephalography (EEG).

PhD Research Seminar

March 9th

15:30

Room 55.309

Tech transfer in the context of Open Science

Speaker: Xavier Serra

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

Discussion about the new roles that technology transfer at universities is creating in the context of Open Science, and of specific initiatives driven by the MTG group, such as Essentia (technology licensing), Music Muni (Spin-off) and the Freesound API (Saas) Xavier Serra. Music Technology Group and Scientific Director of the MdM Strategic Research Program.

PhD Research Seminar

3rd, March

12:30 hours

52.s29

SpectralEdge: from science to startup.

Speaker: Roberto Montagna

Host:  Javier Vazquez Corral

Spectral Edge is both the name of a theorem and the name of a UK-based startup company. This talk will give a brief overview of the Spectral Edge core technology, which revolves around the theorem, and then will try to give an account of the challenges that Spectral Edge (the company) has faced and is facing in growing out of the academic environment.

Roberto Montagna is Principal R&D Engineer for Spectral Edge Ltd. He studied computer science in Verona (Italy), where he was awarded a MSc degree in 2007, and went on to enrol in a doctorate programme at the University of East Anglia (Norwich, UK) under the supervision of Prof Graham Finlayson. During this time he worked on various aspects of colour image processing. He was awarded a PhD degree in 2011, and started working for Spectral Edge Ltd immediately after.

Invited Research Seminar

2nd, March

15:30 hours

55.309

 

 

Creativity, deep symbolic learning, and the information dynamics of thinking

Speaker: Geraint A. Wiggins

Host: Xavier Serra

I present a hypothetical theory of cognition which is based on the principle that mind/brains are information processors and compressors, that are sensitive to certain measures of information content, as defined by Shannon (1948). The model is intended to help explicate processes of anticipatory and creative reasoning in humans and other higher animals. The model is motivated by the evolutionary value of prediction in information processing in an information-overloaded world.


The Information Dynamics of Thinking (IDyOT) model brings together symbolic and non-symbolic cognitive architectures, by combining sequential modelling with hierarchical symbolic memory, in which symbols are grounded by reference to their perceptual correlates. This is achieved by a process of chunking, based on boundary entropy, in which each segment of an input signal is broken into chunks, each of which corresponds with a single symbol in a higher level model. Each chunk corresponds with a temporal trajectory in the complex Hilbert space given by a spectral transformation of its signal; each symbol above each chunk corresponds with a point in a higher space which is in turn a spectral representation of the lower space. Norms in the spaces admit measures of similarity, which allow grouping of categories of symbol, so that similar chunks are associated with the same symbol. This chunking process recurses “up” IDyOT’s memory, so that representations become more and more abstract.

It is possible to construct a Markov Model along a layer of this model, or up or down between layers. Thus, predictions may be made from any part of the structure, more or less abstract, and it is in this capacity that IDyOT is claimed to model creativity, at multiple levels, from the construction of sentences in everyday speech to the improvisation of musical melodies.

IDyOT’s learning process is a kind of deep learning, but it differs from the more familiar neural network formulation because it includes symbols that are explicitly grounded in the learned input, and its answers will therefore be explicable in these terms.

In this talk, I will explain and motivate the design of IDyOT with reference to various different aspects of music, language and speech processing, and to animal behaviour.

Computational Creativity Lab

Queen Mary University of London

February

PhD Research Seminar

16th February

15:30 hours  

Room 52.s29

Session 1/2 : How to prepare a good scientific poster.

Session 2/2: Preparing your scientific poster.

Speaker: Antonios Lioutas

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

During this seminar we will discuss the power of a scientific poster as a vehicle to pass along scientific knowledge, achievements and hypotheses.

  • The purpose of scientific posters
  • Elements of a poster
  • Common pitfalls and golden rules
  • How to prepare and present your poster

Antonios Lioutas is currently a postdoc researcher at the CRG. He is a biologist with a PhD in Biomedicine from the UPF (CRG). Alongside his research in the laboratory at the CRG he has formed a science communication agency together with 4 more researchers, www.biocomunicat.com. Apart from being passionate about his main work in the lab, cancer research, he has organized numerous interactive workshops and science dissemination events.

PhD Research Seminar

23rd February

15:30 hours  

Room 52.s29

AIn the second session, we will analyse the structure of scientific posters in light of what we have learned during the first session. We will discuss on how to ameliorate your poster in order to create a scientific poster with a great impact.

 

 

23rd February

12:30 hours  

AUDITORIUM

 

Overwhelmed by Information? Summarization, Simplification and information extraction at your fingertips. 

Speaker: Horacio Saggion

On-line news, social networks’ posts, e-mails, Wikipedia pages, .... the amount of  information available on-line is growing at unprecedented rates. In this context of information overload, automatic text summarization and information extraction are key Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques  for  extracting the most salient information from a document in order to populate knowledge repositories or provide users with brief stand-alone document surrogates.

Besides the amount of text we have to deal with daily, there is a further problem:  certain types of texts such as news, which are produced for a general audience,  may be too difficult to read and understand by some people, because these texts have a  complex vocabulary and grammar. In this context, automatic text simplification is another NLP  technique which  aims at transforming a text into an equivalent which, using a simpler vocabulary or syntax, would be easier to read and understand.  

Over the past years, we have been working on two lines of research; on the one hand, we have investigated ways to extract and condense the essential  information from massive scientific literature and, on the other hand, we have carried out research to produce multilingual, adaptable,  text simplification solutions for digital inclusion.    In this seminar,  I will take the opportunity to present the work carried out on our research lab on these two distinctive, exciting, and relevant topics in the information society

Horacio is Profesor Agregado  at our Department since 2015 (previously Ramón y Cajal Fellow). He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Université de Montréal. He works on automatic text summarization, text simplification,  information extraction, text processing in social media,  sentiment analysis and related topics. Before joining Universitat Pompeu Fabra, he worked  at the University of Sheffield for a number of UK and European research projects  developing competitive human language technology. He was also an invited researcher at Johns Hopkins University in 2001. He is principal investigator in the EU projects Dr Inventor (scientific summarization and extraction) and Able-to-Include (text simplification).  Horacio has published over 100 works in leading scientific journals, conferences, and books in the field of human language technology.  He is co-editor of a book on multilingual, multisource information extraction and summarization published by Springer  (2012).   Horacio has developed the freely available SUMMA summarization software distributed by UPF. He has received awards from institutions such as Fundación Antorchas, Vodafone Innovation, and Cátedra Telefónica/Universidad de Alicante.

Invited Research Seminar

14th February

15:30 hours  

Room 55.309

Human Computation and Crowdsourcing - Questions and Challenges

Speaker: Alessandro Checco

Host: Boris Bellalta

Over the last decades, we have witnessed an explosion in the use of hybrid systems combining humans and machine learning, and in the outsourcing of jobs to a crowd of workers performing micro-tasks. This trend introduces novel problems, due to the nature of human processing: from technical problems like quality assessment, spam avoidance and consensus building to more social ones like engagement, motivation and fairness for the worker. We present an overview on the challenges in these fields and a brief discussion of the state of the art.

https://www.scss.tcd.ie/Doug.Leith/checcoa/

Mathematical engineer, particularly interested in graph theory, Markov chains, stochastic processes and randomised optmisation algorithms. Currently working on privacy issues in recommender systems. Also interested in high performance parallel computing and big data analysis.

PhD Training Seminar

16th February

12:30 hours  

Room 52.427

Short Introduction to Research Methods

Speaker: Julián Urbano

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

This three-day seminar will cover the basic concepts, methods and tools to critically assess someone else’s published research and carry out one’s own research. The seminar will go about the validity of a body of research (how well it allows us to answer the question under study) and its reliability (how much confidence we can have in its conclusions). In particular, we will cover material on concepts like variables, measurement, sampling, fallacies, biases, and a brief overview of experimental design and statistical analysis.

In January of 2007, I received a degree in Bilingual Computer Engineering from the University Carlos III of Madrid. My thesis, Modeling and Indexing Musical Files to Allow Music Reuse, was graded as excellent cum laude. Meanwhile, I collaborated with the Department of Computer Science and obtained a small scholarship with the Department of Telematics. I also obtained an Erasmus scholarship to study at the Åland Polytechnic (Finland), from January to July of 2006.

Since January of 2007, I was a PhD student in Computer Science at Virginia Tech (USA). As part of my Graduate Research Assistantship, I worked for the Research Methods Consortium in the National Capital Region. In June of 2008 I went back to the University Carlos III of Madrid with a small scholarship, and received a Masters Degree in Computer Science and Technology. Since January of 2009 I was a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Department of Computer Science, while working on my PhD dissertation.

In October of 2013 I finished my PhD with a dissertation titled Evaluation in Audio Music Similarity, which was graded as excellent cum laude. Right after, I spent two years as a postdoctoral researcher in the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, with an A4U Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. In October of 2015 I received a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Government to continue my research.

PhD Research Seminar

10th February

12:00 hours  

Room 55.309

More than words: Machine learning applied to Marketing

Speaker: Cristina Aranda Gutiérrez.

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

PhD Cristina Aranda will talk about the relevance of semantics and pragmatics in technology (Internet of things, Machine Learning, speech technologies, etc.). Through several examples of the processing of linguistic data with impact in both business and social innovation, she will show the relevant role that language processing has in the digital economy.

Cristina Aranda Gutiérrez, Chief Marketing Officer en Intelygenz and Co-founder and Director of MujeresTech

Cristina Aranda is Chief Marketing Officer in Intelygenz, a software development company using agile and scrum technologies, with offices in Madrid, San Francisco (California) and Austin (Texas). Cristina has over 16 years of professional experience in marketing, the startups ecosystem and digital transformation. She has collaborated with several IBEX35 and Top500 companies. 

She also co-founded Mujeres Tech, a non-profit association which has the target to promote actions that increase the number of female working in the digital economy and, at the same time, establish links with the men willing to generate equal opportunities for women. Aranda is Social Innovation Fellow  from the Meridian International Center and the USA Embassy in Madrid.

Cristina holds a PhD in Linguistics (UAM and Instituto Universitario de Investigación Ortega y Gasset), BSc in Hispanic Filology (UAM) and MSc in Internet Business (ISDI).

Twitter https://twitter.com/cris_aranda_

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/cristinaaranda/

 

Short Introduction to Research Methods

Speaker: Julián Urbano

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

This two-day seminar will cover the basic concepts, methods and tools to critically assess someone else’s published research and carry out one’s own research. The seminar will go about the validity of a body of research (how well it allows us to answer the question under study) and its reliability (how much confidence we can have in its conclusions). In particular, we will cover material on concepts like variables, measurement, sampling, fallacies, biases, and a brief overview of experimental design and statistical analysis.

In January of 2007, I received a degree in Bilingual Computer Engineering from the University Carlos III of Madrid. My thesis, Modeling and Indexing Musical Files to Allow Music Reuse, was graded as excellent cum laude. Meanwhile, I collaborated with the Department of Computer Science and obtained a small scholarship with the Department of Telematics. I also obtained an Erasmus scholarship to study at the Åland Polytechnic (Finland), from January to July of 2006.

Since January of 2007, I was a PhD student in Computer Science at Virginia Tech (USA). As part of my Graduate Research Assistantship, I worked for the Research Methods Consortium in the National Capital Region. In June of 2008 I went back to the University Carlos III of Madrid with a small scholarship, and received a Masters Degree in Computer Science and Technology. Since January of 2009 I was a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Department of Computer Science, while working on my PhD dissertation.

In October of 2013 I finished my PhD with a dissertation titled Evaluation in Audio Music Similarity, which was graded as excellent cum laude. Right after, I spent two years as a postdoctoral researcher in the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, with an A4U Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. In October of 2015 I received a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Government to continue my research.

9th February

12:30h -13:30h   

Room 52.427

9th February

15:30 hours  

Room 55.309

The Revenge of the Indians on European Music and Other Art Genres

Later on Concert in Sala Polivalente at 19:30

http://phonos.upf.edu

Speaker: Arthur Clay

Host:  Andres Lewin

The lecture references a comment made by the German playright Heimer Mueller about the music of John Cage. The topic of "randomness" is the starting point in creating the stage for the birth of sound art and how it has reshaped music composition and performance by shifting focus from harmonically organized structures to those that make use of other forms of structuring and expand the pallette of sounds, the approach to making them, and redefine the stage. Light is shed on each of the works presented in the program. How the works came about, how they are constructued, how they are perforned, what notations were used to preserved in the form of a score, and how they figure into the histories of sound are an integral part of the lecture. However, although the lecture acknoeldeges the undeniable relevance of the theories of Duchamp as put into practice by Cage, it also poses the questions as it is possible to acknoweldge such influence, explore it and follow in a direction which was hinted at rather than taken.

I am an arts professional who is celebrated both as an media artist and and as a curator for innovation in arts. As an artists. I have specialized in the use of intermedia creating works using new technologies in wide range of genres.  My works have appeared in galleries, theaters, museums, festivals, as well as on radio and television in Europe, North America, and Asia. Most recent work focuses on media based works using mobile devices in virtuale space. As a curator, I have focused two areas: Creativiely connecting art and science by producing and plaforming research based artworks with the founding and directing of the Digital Art Weeks Festival,  and exploring the potentials of virtual art, exploring its presentation form in public space through the founding and  directing of the Virtuale Switzerland. 

26th January

15:30 hours 

Room 55.410

Ethical issues and data protection, session 1. CIREP-UPF,

Speaker: Silvia Losa & Josep Blat

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

CIREP-UPF (Internal Committee for the Ethical Review of Projects) aims at improving ethical standards and personal data protection in research and academic practices related to human beings, within the UPF community. The first review of a research project by CIREP took place about a year ago.


During this session the basic concepts on both issues, ethics and personal data protection, will be introduced through practical examples. Moreover, it will be discussed how to submit project(s) (proposals) to CIREP for ethics evaluation and approval. The session can be considered as a preparation to submit a proposal on the PhD research and/or acting as a reviewer of such a proposal.

 

26th January

12:30 hours 

Auditorium

Ontogenesis of rational thinking

Speaker: Luca Bonatti

Infants possess several mechanisms to solve domain-specific problems. However, little is know about infants' abilities to reason beyond these limited domains. I will present evidence that suggests that infants have a early sense of rationality. Furthermore, when they witness a scene not previously experienced, infants reason about it by applying basic logical principles. I will argue that such inferences are used to build strategies to inspect the scenes and make inferences to enrich knowledge. I will present data about the behavioral correlates of this inferential processes in infants and adults, focusing on the case of disjunctive reasoning. Finally, I will argue that any well-designed system for human-machine interaction has to embody a model of the cognitive state of a human, in her adult and infant state.

Luca Bonatti is an ICREA Research Professor at the Center for Brain and Cognition of our Department.

He received his Ph.D. in Philosophy of Mind at Rutgers University, under the supervision of Jerry Fodor. He has been full professor at the University of Nantes, associate professor at the University of Paris 8, and at SISSA/ISAS, Trieste, and visiting professor at the Universities of Budapest, Illes Balears and New York. He is interested in reasoning, language learning, imagination of physical events and infant cognition.

He has promoted a dual model of language acquisition, giving evidence that lexical learning and grammatical learning recruit different acquisition mechanisms. In infant cognition, his work focuses on early abilities of reasoning about the future, and on how basic categories affect infants' organization of experience. Recently, with his collaborators, he has proposed a novel theory of how infants reason about uncertain events and on how their reasoning is affected by what they experience. He has tried to show that infants have intuitions about the future that are not based on their experience of the past, but on their logical abilities of analyzing current events. 

19th January

15:30 hours 

Room 55.410

 

Today's ETIC Streaming 

Why Reproducibility Matters? A Personal Experience

Speaker: Sertan Sertürk

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

  • How many times have you got frustrated, because your code from last month refuses to run and your past self didn’t bother to leave you any guidelines?

  • Are you scared that one day a colleague will ask you the data/results of a paper, and you will have to excavate them out of a folder named ‘allDataResultsVersion8bFinalizedRecheckedPleaseEnd’?

  • Are you concerned that your contributions will not have much impact, because people may not be able to access them properly?

If yes, you are in the same shoes with me, when I started my PhD! In this talk, I will present how I embraced reproducibility to avoid some of these common mistakes. I will explain some best practices, simple tricks and habits I have learned throughout my doctoral research, which improved the quality of my research, made it reusable by others (and myself), and hence improved the accessibility and visibility of my work. I will give practical examples in where I failed (and then gradually improved) on organizing, developing, versioning, documenting, licensing and publishing the research material (data, code, experimental setups and results etc.). I will also introduce some of the available software tools and services, which would help you to achieve these goals. I hope that this talk will convince you to consider reproducibility as a major criteria in academic research, and give you a head start on achieving this objective.

Sertan Sentürk is a PhD candidate in the Music Technology Group working in the CompMusic project (http://compmusic.upf.edu/) under the supervision of Prof. Xavier Serra. He has recently submitted my thesis titled "Computational Analysis of Audio Recordings and Music Scores for the Description and Discovery of Ottoman-Turkish Makam Music," where he addresses several shortcomings on the current state of the art methodologies in music information retrieval (MIR) and propose several computational approaches to automatically analyze and describe large corpora belonging to this music tradition. Throughout his PhD, he ha dedicated a fair amount of effort for the openness and reproducibility of his doctoral research.
 
He wants to pursue an academic career in music technology, and specialise in music information retrieval, audio signal processing, machine learning and music perception & cognition with an
emphasis on different music traditions in the world. As a part of his endeavours, he wants to develop computational methodologies to understand and discover the modes of musical creativity, expressivity and interaction."

17th January

17:00h-21:00h

Room 52.023Free event but if you want to join, please register here

Let's fill the Wikipedia gender gap

Speaker: David Laniado

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

Wikipedia was created on January 15th 2001. We join this anniversary with the aim to overcome one of its bitter-sweet outcomes: the existing gender gap in editors, in articles, in type of descriptions. As a collaboration of  Civic Lab Barcelona , ViquidonesUPF and  DTIC-UPF, we invite you to this event.

 

 

17:00h - 18:00h - Talk: Gender Gap in Collaborative Platforms: Language and emotions in Wikipedia Discussions. (Talk in Spanish, details above). David Laniado (Digital Humanities, Eurecat).

18:00h - 18:30h - Announcement of finalist schools of the Wisibilizalas contest
18:30h - 21:00h - Viquimarató with ViquidonesUPF. Learn how to edit and make your individual contribution to overcome the gender gap! You need to bring your laptop! All details in this link

16th January

16:30 hours

Room 52.s29

Latest research in thoracic image analysis and biomarker quantification 

Speaker: Adrià Pérez-Rovira (Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam)

Host:  Miguel Ángel González Ballester

Adria will talk about his latest research in thoracic image analysis and biomarker quantification that is allowing clinicians, and radiologists in particular, to gain a better understanding of disease-induced structural and dynamic changes in the lung. More information: http://perezrovira.net/adria/research

Adria Perez-Rovira got his BSc in Computer Science at the UPF and an MSc on image analysis at the UAB, both in Barcelona. In 2011 he obtained a PhD in retinal image analysis at the University of Dundee (Scotland), where he had focused on non-rigid registration and quantification of retinal vasculature biomarkers. After a brief period working on automated detection and visualisation of stenosis in angiographic full body MRI at Ninewells Hospital (Dundee, Scotland) he moved to Rotterdam (the Netherlands) as a post-doc researcher at the Erasmus MC. In there he developed automated image analysis techniques to quantify and discover image biomarkers related to bronchiectasis and other lung-related diseases in MRI and CT like Pompe or cystic fibrosis.

12th January

15:30 hours 

Room 55.410

 

How to develop an academic career related to ICT. 

Topics to cover: Information and Communications Technologies as an academic field; Needed competences for an academic career; Steps in an academic career; From Master to PhD; From PhD to Postdoc.

Speaker: Xavier Serra

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

 

 

 

A PhD is a general requirement to make a career in academia, and PhD programs are often designed for that purpose. But the number of new PhD holders each year is significantly higher than the number of available positions in academia. During this talk we will discuss some relevant issues to consider to pursue (or discard) careers in this environment.

Suggested readings:
- The disposable academics - The Economist http://www.economist.com/node/17723223 
- An academic career: Research careers in academia (Univ. Manchester)
http://www.academiccareer.manchester.ac.uk/about/phdandbeyond/phdtopermanent/
- Careers section in Nature (oriented to bio, but with several articles relevant for any area of research)
http://www.nature.com/nature/careers/

Xavier Serra is Associate Professor of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies and Director of the Music Technology Group at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. After a multidisciplinary academic education he obtained a PhD in Computer Music from Stanford University in 1989 with a dissertation on the spectral processing of musical sounds that is considered a key reference in the field. His research interests cover the computational analysis, description and synthesis of sound and music signals, with a balance between basic and applied research and approaches from both scientific/technological and humanistic/artistic disciplines. Dr. Serra is very active in fields of Audio Signal Processing, Sound and Music Computing, Music Information Retrieval and Computation Musicology at the local and international levels, being involved in the editorial board of a number of journals and conferences and giving lectures on current and future challenges of these fields. He was awarded an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council to carry out the project CompMusic aimed at promoting multicultural approaches in music information research.

21st  December

10- 10:30 hours

55.410

Transferring our knowledge to the society

Speaker: Jordi Arias and Manuel Palacin.

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

In this talk we will present a new transference programme that accompanies entrepreneurs from the best national universities and research centres in the tedious task of approaching technologies from lab to the market. The programme challenge is to help researchers and technologists to bridge the gap between discovery and commercialisation of their technologies to build marketable products and create high growth science based businesses. To complement the research activities of the investigators, the programme provides a scientific core team led by entrepreneurs in residence that will be in charge of mobilising internal resources as well as external collaborators whenever needed, freeing scientists from the business side and letting them focus on what they do best, research.

Mobile World Capital Barcelona (mVenturesBcn)

 

15th December

16:00 hours

Auditorium Poblenou Campus.

Data -Driven Design of Study Plans

Speaker: Rakesh Agrawal

Host:  Ricardo Baeza

A study plan is the choice of concepts and the organization and sequencing of the concepts to be covered in an educational course. While a good study plan is essential for the success of any course offering, the design of study plans currently remains largely a manual task. We present a novel data-driven method, which given a list of concepts can automatically propose candidate plans to cover all the concepts. Our method uses Wikipedia as an external source of knowledge to both identify which concepts should be studied together and how students should move from one group of concepts to another. For our experimental validation, we synthesize study plan for a course defined by a list of concept names from high school physics. Our user study with domain experts finds that our method is able to produce a study plan of high quality.

Rakesh Agrawal is the President and Founder of the Data Insights Laboratories. He is a member of National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of ACM, and a Fellow of IEEE. He has been both an IBM Fellow and a Microsoft Fellow. ACM SIGKDD awarded him its inaugural Innovations Award and ACM SIGMOD the Edgar F. Codd Award. He was named to the Scientific American’s First list of top 50 Scientists. Rakesh has been granted 85+ patents and published 200+ papers, including the 1st and 2nd highest cited in databases and data mining. Four of his papers have received “test-of-time” awards. His papers have received more than 100,000 citations and his H-Index is 96. His research formed the nucleus of IBM Intelligent Miner that led the creation of data mining as a new software category. Besides Intelligent Miner, several other commercial products incorporate his work, including IBM DB2 and WebSphere and Microsoft Bing.

15th December

15:30 hours  

New Room 

Auditorium Poblenou Campus.

Research careers in industry

Speaker: Ricardo Baeza

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

 

 

12th December

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

 

Multi-objective Local Search algorithms – From theory to real life applications

Speaker: Vitor Nazário Coelho

Host:  Emilia Gómez

 

In this talk, Vitor will introduce some trajectory search algorithms. In order to understand the concept, neighborhood structures and exploration techniques will be explained and discussed. A brief history about metaheuristics algorithms, embedded with local search capabilities, will also be taken into account. Finally, some combinatorial optimization problems will be considered. In particular, he will point out open challenges in the field of Mini/Microgrid systems for Renewable Energy Resources integration, which will be part of the hearth of the future smart cities.

Vitor Nazário Coelho finished his PhD in the area of mini/microgrid systems optimization. 

During his 8 years experience designing and implementing metaheuristics, he has been tackling several different NP-Hard Combinatorial Optimization problems. He already visited more than 40 countries and did part of his studies in 4 different countries (Brazil, Spain, England and Israel). Motivated by the nature and inspired by the evolution of the species, his research group in Brazil are releasing open-source codes, designing novel tools for using metaheuristic algorithms, as well as developing the optimization framework OptFrame.

 

1st December

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

 

On Crowdlearning: How do People Learn in the Wild?

Speaker: Manuel Gomez Rodriguez

Host:  Vicenç Gómez

 

Learning from the crowd has become increasingly popular in the Web and social media. There is a variety of crowdlearning sites, ranging from wikis and question answering (Q&A) sites to online  communities and blogs, in which users learn from knowledge that other users contribute to the site and knowledge is reviewed and curated by the same users using assessment measures such as upvotes, likes or shares. In this talk, I will present a family of machine learning models and inference methods that leverage the digital traces left by the users of these sites to, on the one hand, shed light on how they learn over time and become experts, and, on the other hand, identify trustworthy knowledge contributions of high value, which systematically help users to increase their expertise.

Manuel Gomez Rodriguez is a tenure-track faculty at Max Planck Institute for Software Systems. Manuel develops machine learning and large-scale data mining methods for the analysis, modeling and control of large real-world networks and processes that take place over them. He is particularly interested in problems arising in the Web and social media and has received several recognitions for his research, including an Outstanding Paper Award at NIPS'13 and a Best Research Paper Honorable Mention at KDD'10. Manuel holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Carlos III University in Madrid (Spain). You can find more about him at http://www.mpi-sws.org/~manuelgr/.

25th November

10:00 hours  

Room 55.309

 

Imaging biomarkers: algorithms, open data and infrastructure for neurological disorders"

Speaker: Christian Barillot 

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

One of the major challenges in clinical neuroimaging is to detect quantitative signs of pathological evolution as early as possible in order to prevent disease progression, evaluate therapeutic protocols or even better understand and model the normal history of a given neurological pathology. A particular challenge is to find correlations between brain structures at the morphometric, structural, metabolic or functional level through a large set of multimodal images. MRI is the premier means to study the human brain through various acquisition protocols. This presentation will illustrate this challenge through the use of novel cellular or structural MRI protocols able to provide relevant information at the cellular or micro-structural level. Technological perspectives will be also provided about general issues of Medical Imaging as a Service in the context of the emerging open data services and digital infrastructures. After introducing the general context, some examples will be provided of how these new services can be implemented, and applied to neurological diseases, and especially Multiple Sclerosis.

 

24th November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Scientific Dissemination, Online Repositories, and Author's Rights.

Speaker: Ana Baiges

The purpose of the meeting is to explain the services that the Library offers to UPF researchers and graduate students in the preparation of scientific publications, and the aspects to take into account in their dissemination. A particular emphasis will be placed on intellectual property issues on the compliance with European and Spanish policies on open access (Horizon 2020, Plan Estatal ICTI) and an overview on author profiles and affiliation.

 

21st November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Graph-Based Feature Extraction: Trying to understand musical patterns in audio signals outside the time-frequency domain.

Speaker: Dirceu Melo

Host: Emilia Gómez

The feature extraction is a very important step in music audio classification. This task has been performed by renowned descriptors using, in most cases, the time-frequency approach. In this talk we will present a descriptor that extract features of an audio signal by the topological analysis of his respective visibility network. Through the measure of the network’s modularity we will show that the quality and quantity of partitions of each audio-associated network, are directly associated with quality and quantity of the audio local peaks, and more: this feature can provide meaningful information to classify labeled sets and identify different levels of dynamics density among different music genres.

Dirceu Melo is a professor at the Department of Mathematics at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Bahia, Brazil. In his master thesis at SENAI CIMATEC - Brazil, he studied patterns in audio signals using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. He is a PhD student of the Knowledge Dissemination Doctoral Program at the Federal University of Bahia. In the research line Construction of Knowledge: Cognition, Languages and Information, he develops a work involving Music Information Retrieval and Graph Theory.

17th November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Process and effectiveness:biomarkers in music therapy research

Speaker: Prof. Jorg Fachner

Host: Rafael Ramírez

How can we document change as a function of doing music in a therapeutic setting and how does it work? Biomarkers representing the effectiveness and those representing the music therapy process are related to an accumulation of and a focus on important moments in therapy time. Analysing resting state EEG may inform about group effects, while moments of interest in the improvisational process may reveal synchronization of brain processes. In music therapy it may be an important key to understand where and why change in therapy occurs. The presentation will discuss the promises of biomarkers and neurometrics for music therapy, it will draw on results of depression research, on recent work with wireless EEGs and improvisation, music performance, neurofeedback and game applications in psychiatric and neurorehabilitation.

Dr. Fachner, since 2013 Professor for Music, Health and the Brain at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, UK, is interested in translational issues of interdisciplinary research topics between medicine, humanities and music sciences. Starting in Germany 20 years ago, he has been working as a professional in the field of Music Therapy (MT) and brain research, was and is active in EU and Academy of Finland MT research projects and serves on international MT advisory and policy boards. Studying Music Therapy processes, brain responses and treatment of depression, as well as consciousness states and time perception, his scientific output comprises over 100 publications in journals and books across disciplines. Recent projects, collaborations and publications focus on biomarkers, neurodynamics, timing and kairological principles of the MT process and effectiveness

15th November

17:00 hours  

Room 52.321

Rhythm Transcription of Piano Performances Based on Hierarchical. Bayesian Modelling of Repetition and Modification of Musical Note
Patterns

Speaker: Dr. Eita Nakamura 

Host: Rafael Ramírez

We present a method of rhythm transcription (i.e., automatic recognition of note values in music performance signals) based on a Bayesian music language model that describes the repetitive structure of musical notes. Conventionally, music language models for music transcription are trained with a dataset of musical pieces. Because typical musical pieces have repetitions consisting of a limited number of note patterns, better models fitting individual pieces could be obtained by inducing compact grammars. The main challenges are inducing appropriate grammar for a score that is observed indirectly through a performance and capturing incomplete repetitions, which can be represented as repetitions with modifications. We propose a hierarchical Bayesian model in which the generation of a language

model is described with a Dirichlet process and the production of musical notes is described with a hierarchical hidden Markov model (HMM) that incorporates the process of modifying note patterns. We derive an efficient algorithm based on Gibbs sampling for simultaneously inferring from a performance signal the score and the individual language model behind it. Evaluations showed that the proposed model outperformed previously studied HMM-based models.
 

 

Kyoto University, Japan.

10th November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Gender and Science

Speaker: Gender and Science Club: Pallabi Sengupta

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields remain severely underrepresented. In Spain, women represent about 15% of full (catedras) professorships and, unfortunately, UPF isn't an exception to this general trend. Moreover, women are judged to be less competent, receive less payment and research facilities, and are less likely to be awarded research grants compared with male scientists. The different mechanisms leading to this disparity have been investigated and more is brought to light by ongoing research. In this talk we will explain the different challenges faced by women in STEM careers, the reasons and the mechanisms through which they emerge, and changes (big and small) that we can all do to improve the current dire scenario.

 

9th November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

 

Texture synthesis using local Gaussian patch models

Speaker: Lara Raad

Host:  Coloma Ballester

 

Lara Raad received the Ph.D. degree from Ecole Normale Supérieur de Cachan, Université Paris Saclay, in October 2016. Before that she received the graduate degree from Universidad de la Républica, Uruguay, in electrical engineering in 2012, the graduate degree from Telecom Bretagne in engineering in 2011, and he MSc degree in applied mathematics in Ecole normale supérieure de Cachan, France in 2012. She is actually a post-doctoral researcher in Jean-Michel Morel’s group at Ecole Normale Supérieur de Cachan, Université Paris Saclay. Her research interest include image and signal processing, computer vision and computational imaging.

3rd November

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Reproducibility in research

Speaker: Aurelio Ruiz

An objective of the María de Maeztu Strategic Research Program is “to increase the impact of our research by increasing the impact of the publications, datasets and software tools, and take advantage of this impact to establish and consolidate partnerships”. It includes actions to promote that the research results, datasets and tools are discoverable, interpretable and reusable, including the publication of the data and software together with the publications. During this session, we will discuss some of the topics linked to "reproducible research", including the increasing requirements in making datasets and computer code available by funding agencies, publishers and potential mechanisms to promote it in our organisation being elaborated in the context of the Maria de Maeztu program.

Suggested reading:

-Reproducible Research in Signal Processing - What, why, and how. Vandewalle, Patrick; Kovacevic, Jelena; Vetterli, Martin. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine (ISSN: 1053-5888), vol. 26, num. 3, p. 37-47. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2009

-Ongoing draft document within MdM for good practices for discussion in this link

-For a survey on NIPS participants and motivations (2008): "The Scientific Method in Practice: Reproducibility in the Computational Sciences", Stodden, Victoria. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4773-10.

Aurelio Ruiz has a Telecommunications Engineering Degree (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and a Master in Science Management and Leadership (IDEC, UPF). After research and educational traineeships at Technical University Munich, EPFL and CERN, he was responsible for project management in the banking and aeronautical sectors with projects in Europe, Asia and Africa. Since 2006 he is with UPF, currently working in the management of the Maria de Maeztu strategic research program.

25th  October

15:30 hours  

Room 55.410

Dynamics of Phase Oscillators with Generalized Coupling

Speaker: Christian Bick

Host:  Ralph Andrzejak

The emergence of collective behavior is a fascinating feature of interacting oscillatory units in nature and technology. We study systems of phase oscillators which provide an approximation for weakly coupled oscillators. In contrast to the classical Kuramoto equations, where the interaction is determined by the sine of the phase differences, we are interested in symmetrically coupled networks where the interaction can have more than one nontrivial Fourier component. On the one hand, we are interested in the effect generalized coupling has on the dynamics and bifurcations occurring in the system. On the other hand, we investigate how generalized coupling can be exploited in applications, for example to design and potentially control desired localized dynamics.

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences -University of Exeter

Biosketch: I did my PhD work at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, in Göttingen, Germany in applied dynamical systems obtaining a PhD from the University of Göttingen in Mathematics in 2012. I moved to Rice University, Houston, TX for a postdoctoral position with Mike Field working on asynchronous dynamics of networks. I currently hold a Marie Curie Research Fellowship at the University of Exeter to study oscillator networks with generalized coupling. I will be moving to the Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford in fall.

24th  October

15:30 hours  

Room 52309

Speaker: Angela Dobele

  Deputy Head (Research & Innovation) The School of Economics, Finance & Marketing, RMIT University, Australia

20th  October

15:30 hours  

Room 52.323

Introduction to PhD training seminars series 2016/2017 for 1st year PhD students. 

Speaker: Aurelio Ruiz

   

13th  October

15:30 hours  

Room 55.309

Welcome Session for  PhD Students 

Speakers :Emilia Gomez, Miquel Oliver, Miguel Angel González Ballester, Vanesa Dazam Davinia Hernández-Leo & Aurelio Ruiz

Important information about academic and organizational aspects of the doctoral program and the department. Meet your colleagues

 

19th  October

12:30 hours  

Room 55.410

semantic Representations of Word Senses, Concepts and Entities and their Applications

Speaker: Jose Camacho Collados

 

(Google Doctoral Fellow and PhD student at Sapienza University of Rome)

28th September

12:00 hours  

Room 52.221

Data and Algorithmic Bias in the Web

Speaker: Ricardo Baeza 

Host:  Aurelio Ruiz

 

 The Web is the largest public big data repository that humankind has created. In this overwhelming data ocean, we need to be aware of the quality and, in particular, of the biases that exist in this data. In the Web, biases also come from redundancy and spam, as well as from algorithms that we design to improve the user experience. This problem is further exacerbated by biases that are added by these algorithms, specially in the context of search and recommendation systems. They include selection and presentation bias in many forms, interaction bias, social bias, etc. We give several examples and their relation to sparsity and privacy, stressing the importance of the user context to avoid these biases.

 Ricardo Baeza-Yates areas of expertise are web search and data mining, information retrieval, data science and algorithms. He is CTO of NTENT, a semantic search technology company. Before he was VP of Research at Yahoo Labs, based in Barcelona, Spain, and later in Sunnyvale, California, from January 2006 to February 2016. He also is part time Professor at DTIC of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, in Barcelona, Spain, as well as at DCC of Universidad de Chile in Santiago. Until 2004 he was Professor and founding director of the Center for Web Research at the later place. He obtained a Ph.D. in CS from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 1989. He is co-author of the best-seller Modern Information Retrieval textbook published by Addison-Wesley in 2011 (2nd ed), that won the ASIST 2012 Book of the Year award. From 2002 to 2004 he was elected to the board of governors of the IEEE Computer Society and in 2012 he was elected for the ACM Council. Since 2010 is a founding member of the Chilean Academy of Engineering. In 2009 he was named ACM Fellow and in 2011 IEEE Fellow, among other awards and distinctions. 

Sep

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

29 
(Tue)

Anders Jonsson
DTIC, UPF

AIG

12:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Lifelong Sequential Decision Making

 

Oct

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

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(Fri)

Constantine Butakoff
DTIC, UPF

PhySense

12:30 pm 
Room 55.309

Computational techniques for cardiac structure representation and analysis

8

 

---

 

 

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14 
(Wed)

Yasuko Sugito, 
NHK, Japan

Marcelo Bertalmio (IP4EC)

12:30 pm 
Room 52.s25

HEVC/H.265 Codec System and Transmission Experiments aimed at 8K Broadcasting

Julian O’Kelly,
Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability, UK

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Music Therapy with Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness: in Retrospect and Prospect

15

 

---

 

 

---

 

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

 

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19 
(Mon)

Ye Wang
National University of Singapore

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Sound, Music and Sensor Computing for Health and Wellbeing.

22

Ralph Andrzejak
UPF-DTIC

NTSA

1:00 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

Luz Rello
Carnegie Mellon University

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Change Dyslexia: Early Detection and Intervention at Large Scale

29

Ana Baiges, 
UPF Library Services

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Scientific Dissemination, Online Repositories, and Author's Rights

 

Nov

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

2
(Mon)

Jeffrey C. Smith 
CEO and Co-Founder,Smule

Xavier Serra (MTG)

1:15 pm 
Room 52.S27

User Engagement with Data Science

5

Ichiro Fujinaga
McGill University

Xavier Serra (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Single Interface for Music Score Searching and Analysis Project

12

Seiji Isotani
University of Sao Paulo

Davinia Hernandez-Leo (GTI)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Advancements in Intelligent Support for Collaborative Learning

13 
(Fri)

José Vicente Manjón Herera,
UPV

Miguel Angel Gonzalez Ballester (SIMBIOSYS)

11:30 am 
Room 52.S27

Applications of non-local medical image processing

19

Leo Wanner
UPF-DTIC

TALN

1:00 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

Olivier Coulon
Aix-Marseille University

Miguel Angel Gonzalez Ballester (SIMBIOSYS)

4:30 pm 
Room 52.329

Organization and variability of the cerebral cortex: quantification and modeling

26

Daniel Wolff
UPF-DTIC

Emilia Gomez (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Spot The Odd Song Out: Similarity models in analysis of corpora and listener groups

 

Dec

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3

Jesus Alonso-Zarate
CTTC

Boris Bellalta (WN)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S29

The Internet of Things: A Brave New World

10

Marcelo Bertalmío
UPF-DTIC

IP4EC

12:30 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

17

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

24

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

31

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

 

---

 

 

---

 

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

 

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14

Gustavo Deco
UPF-DTIC

CNS

12:30 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

Antonios Lioutas
CRGBIOcomuniCA'T

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Session 1/2 : How to prepare a good scientific poster. [Slides]

19 
(Tue)

Gwanggil Jeon
Incheon National University, Korea

Marcelo Bertalmío (IP4EC)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Color Demosaicking in Frequency Domain

21

Ricardo Marques
UPF-DTIC

GTI

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Spherical Integration for Global Illumination: From Quasi to Bayesian Monte Carlo

28

Francisco Herrera
University of Granada

Xavier Binefa

12:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Big data preprocessing

Simón Lee
Incubio

Aurelio Ruiz García

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Incubio: The Big Data Academy

 

Feb

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title


(Wed)

Nicolas Schweighofer
University of Southern California

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

4:00 pm 
Room 55.410

Computational neurorehabilitation: modeling interactions between arm use and function post-stroke

4

Antonios Lioutas
CRGBIOcomuniCA'T

Aurelio Ruiz

12:00 noon 
Room 52.S31

Session 2/2: Preparing your scientific poster.[Slides]

Diemo Schwarz
IRCAM, Paris

Xavier Serra (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.123

Tangible and Embodied Interaction on Surfaces, with Mobile Phones, and with Tapioca

Bob Sturm
Queen Mary University of London

Xavier Serra (MTG)

4:30 pm 
Room 52.123

The scientific evaluation of music content analysis systems: Toward valid empirical foundations for future real-world impact

11

Diarmuid P. O'Donoghue
Maynooth University, Ireland

Horacio Saggion (TALN)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Computational Modelling of Analogy and Blending for scientific creativity [Slides]

18

Antoni Ivorra
UPF-DTIC

BERG

12:30 pm
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

25

Aurelio Ruiz, 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S31

Communication Skills in Science: Preparing for Research in 4 minutes [Slides]

 

Mar

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3

Alexandros Karatzoglou
Telefonica Research

Gergely Neu (AI)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Deep Learning [Slides]

10

Carla Rafols Salvador, 
UPF-DTIC

WiCom

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Cryptography for Non-Cryptographers

17

Emilia Gómez

MTG

1:00 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

24

 

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31

 

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Apr

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

Miguel Ángel González Ballester

SIMBIOSYS

12:30 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

11 
(Mon)

Kadi Bouatouch andChristian Bouville
INRIA/IRISA Rennes, France

Josep Blat (GTI)

11:00 am 
Room 55.410

Toward More and More Realism in Computer Graphics

14

Simone Tassani
UPF-DTIC

SIMBIOSYS

3-5 pm (2 hours) 
Room 52.S29

Session 1 of 3: Statistical Analysis and Design of Experiments [Slides: 01]

19 
(Tue)

Alfonso Martinez
UPF-DTIC

ITC

12:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Some Results on Mismatched Decoding in Information Theory

21

Simone Tassani
UPF-DTIC

SIMBIOSYS

3-5 pm (2 hours) 
Room 55.410

Session 2 of 3: Statistical Analysis and Design of Experiments [Slides: 23]

28

Simone Tassani
UPF-DTIC

SIMBIOSYS

3-5 pm (2 hours) 
Room 55.410

Session 3 of 3: Statistical Analysis and Design of Experiments [Slides: 45]

 

May

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title


(Wed)

Roberto Martinez-Maldonado
University of Technology, Sydney (UTS)

Davinia Hernández-Leo (GTI)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Multi-modal sequence mining and analytics of face-to-face collaborative learning

5

Abelardo Pardo
University of Sydney

Davinia Hernandez-Leo (GTI)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Feedback at scale with a little help from my algorithms


(Fri)

Rubén Moreno

UPF-DTIC

12:00 pm 
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

10 
(Tue)

Miguel Ballesteros
UPF-DTIC

TALN

12:30 pm 
Room 52.121

Deep Learning for Transition-based Natural Language Processing. [Streaming]

12

Aurelio Ruiz

UPF-DTIC

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Reproducibility in research

18 
(Wed)

Arianne Bercowsky
UPF-DTIC

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

4:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Colorectal Cancer preventive treatment approach

19

Malcolm Bain
id law partners

Emilia Gomez (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Software licensing – from basic to advanced licensing and business models

26

Andreas Kaltenbrunner
EURECAT

Vicenç Gómez (AI)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Studying Societal Debates through Wikipedia

 

Jun

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

2

 

---

 

 

---

 

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

 

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9

Rosa Montañà, 
TDX and PhD thesis coordinator

UPF Library

3:30 pm 
Room 52.S29

Copyright in PhD thesis reports. [Slides]

14 
(Tue)

Clarence Barlow
UCSB

Xavier Serra (MTG)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

On Synthrumentation - the Spectral Analysis of Speech for Subsequent Resynthesis by Acoustic Instruments

16

Hector Geffner

AIG

12:30 pm
Auditorium

[Integrative Research Seminar]

23

 

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30

 

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Sep

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

25

Daniele Quercia
Yahoo! Research

Xavier Binefa

3:30pm
Room 52.321

The shortest path to happiness: Recommending beautiful, quiet, and happy routes in the city.Video

 

Oct

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

 

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3 (Fri)

Bert Kappen
Radboud University Nijmegen, 
The Netherlands

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.309

Optimal control and optimal sampling: A statistical physics perspective.

7 (Tue)

Periklis Chatzimisios 
ATEITHE, Tessaloniki, Greece

Boris Bellalta (NeTS)

10:00 am
Room 55.410

Technologies, Standards and Applications of Wireless Local Area Networking (moving from WiFi to 5G)

9

 

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16

 

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23

Jordi Gonzalez
UAB

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Towards Video-Hermeneutics: From Pixels to Semantics

24 (Fri)

Shihab Shamma
University of Maryland

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

11:00 am 
Room 55.410

Cortical Mechanisms to Navigate Complex Auditory Scenes

30

José L. Pons
CSIC

Antoni Ivorra (BERG)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Hybrid Neurorobots and Neuroprostheses for Rehabilitation and Assistance

 

Nov

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

6

Jean-Pierre Changeux
Institute Pasteur, Paris

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

10:30 am 
Poblenou campus Auditorium

The selective stabilisation of synapses and the development of cultural circuits in the human brain

6

Tobias Maier
Maier Mateu Science Communication

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Career Paths for Scientists - The Quest for the Best Alternative

12 (Wed)

Jan D'hooge
KU Leuven

Gemma Piella (SIMBioSys)

12:00 noon 
Room 55.410

Novel directions in Cardiac Ultrasound

13

 

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14 (Fri)

Fernando Villavicencio
National Institute of Informatics, Japan

Jordi Bonada (MTG)

12:00 noon 
Room 52.s31

Some applications of Voice-Transformation to Singing-Voice

20

Jordi Garcia Ojalvo
CEXS, UPF

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Information integration by dynamical networks

27

Victor Pascual Avila
WebRTChacks.com

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

WebRTC: The Democratization of multimedia communications

 

Dec

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

 

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---

 

 

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11

Giovanni Pezzulo
ISTC-CNR, Italy

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

3:30 pm 
Room 52.s25

Planning and the rat hippocampus

18

 

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25

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

1

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

8

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

15

 

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16 (Fri)

Sergio Escalera
UB

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

10:30 am
Room 55.309

Multi-class Learning via Error-Correcting Output Codes and its applications to Human Pose Recovery and Behavior Analysis

22

Mayo Fuster
UAB and Berkman Center

Josep Blat (GTI)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

P2Pvalue: Conditions that favor value creation in collaborative processes onlineVideo

29

Martha A Garcia-Murillo
Syracuse University

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Workshop on Leadership and Culture
For Master's and PhD students only!

30 (Fri)

Daniel Grajales
Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia

Aurelio Ruiz

10:30 am
Room 52.223

DIYbio Barcelona

 

Feb

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5

Jornada d'Investigadors Predoctorals Interdisciplinària: An all-day event organized by UB and recommended for PhD students. Students interested in participating in the Speed Networking activity or those who would like to have an oral presentation should register by January 18th. No registration is needed if you are only interested in attending the event.

12

Antonios Lioutas
CRGBIOcomuniCA'T

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30pm 
Room 52.327

Session 1: The basics of good science communication

13 (Fri)

Joan Domingo Gispert
Pasqual Maragall Foundation

Bart Bijnens (PhySense)

12:00 noon
Room 55.410

Neuroimaging in the Alzheimer & Families (ALFA) Study: Role of the APOE4 genotype

Germund Hesslow
Lund University

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

4:00 pm
Room 55.410

Synaptic mechanisms of learned timing in the cerebellum

18 (Wed)

Ángel Alejandro Juan Pérez
UOC

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Simheuristic algorithms: applications to Logistics, Transportation, and Volunteer Computing

19

Antonios Lioutas
CRGBIOcomuniCA'T

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30pm 
Room 55.410

Session 2: How to prepare a good scientific poster
link to slides

26

Antonios Lioutas
CRGBIOcomuniCA'T

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30pm 
Room 55.410

Session 3: Preparing your poster
link to slides

 

Mar

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5

Maria Esther Vidal
Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas, Venezuela

Jorge Lobo

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Discovering Associations from Semantically Annotated Biomedical Data
slides in pdf

12

Eugenio Tacchini
Università Cattolica di Piacenza, Italy

Xavier Serra (MTG)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

State of the art of Music Recommender Systems and open challenges
slides in pdf

18 (Wed)

Francesco Bonchi 
Yahoo Labs Barcelona

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

3:30 pm
Room 52.s31

On information propagation and communities in social networks

19

Juan Alvarez de Lara 
Seed and Click

Aurelio Ruiz

3:30 pm 
Room 52.329

New Ways of Funding: Crowdfunding and Business Angels & PRIMAVERAPRO STARTUPS 2015

26

Naila Murray
Xerox Research Centre Europe

Amin Mantrach (Yahoo! Research)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Generalized Max Pooling

 

Apr

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

 

---

 

 

---

 

Happy Easter!

 

---

 

7 (Tue)

Ian Poole
Toshiba Medical Visualization Systems, Edinburgh

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

3:00 pm
Room 55.410

Landmarks and Atlases

9

Anastasios A. Economides
University of Macedonia, Greece

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Internet of Things, Wireless Sensor Networks & Security

16

Marlies Van der Wee
Ghent University

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 52.327

Supporting strategic decisions in FTTH deployments – Techno-economic evaluation in a multi-actor setting

23

 

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Happy Sant Jordi! 

 

 

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30

Wolfgang Minker 
University of Ulm

Leo Wanner (TALN)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Spoken Dialogue Systems – Towards User-Centred Functionality and Assistance

 

May

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

7

Angel Herraiz
Utani Lab

Narcís Parés (CMTech)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

R+D+I (Rock+Dream+Impact)

12 (Tue)

Esteban Maestre
McGill University, Montreal

Rafael Ramírez (MTG)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Recent progress in efficient physics-based synthesis of string instrument sound

14

David Escudero, 
Universidad de Valladolid

Leo Wanner (TALN)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Text-to-speech: past, present and future of talking machines

21

Aurelio Ruiz, 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Communication Skills in Science: Preparing for Research in 4 minutesslides in pptx

27 (Wed)

Anders Jonsson
DTIC, UPF

Artificial Intelligence Group (AIG)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Under the Hood of Deep Learning

28

Amparo Alonso Betanzos, 
Universidade da Coruña

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Divide et impera: Machine Learning for distributed environments

 

Jun

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Monika Dominguez Bajo
DTIC, UPF

Internal Speaker (TALN)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Presenting your Research Proposal. A Hands-On Workshop.slides in pdf

8 (Mon)

Jan Atkinson
University College London
Oliver Braddick
University of Oxford

Nava Rubin

3:30 pm
Room TBA

The Developing Visual Brain: from newborn infants to numeracy

11

Alessandro Checco
Trinity College Dublin

Boris Bellalta (NeTS)

3:30 pm
Room 55.410

Privacy Issues in Recommender Systems

18

Gabriel Martins Dias
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (NeTS)

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

6 Reasons Why You Should Start Using R

25

DTIC Participants of Rin4

UPF-DTIC

3:30 pm 
Room 55.410

Get to know about your colleagues' experience of participating in Research in 4 Minutes

Sep

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

26

 

---

 

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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Oct

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1 (Tue)

Jônatas Manzolli
UNICAMP, Brazil

Narcis Pares (CMTech)

Room 55.309 
3:30pm

Interactive Composition, Sonification based on Models derived from Computational Neuroscience

3

 

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Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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10

Paul Verschure 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (SPECS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Consciousness in Brains and Machines: The Distributed Adaptive Control theory of consciousnessVideo

17

Javier Vázquez-Corral
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (IP4EC)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Color constancy in natural scenes through color naming and sensor sharpenningVideo

24

George Tzanetakis
University of Victoria

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Physical Modelling Beyond Sound Synthesis: three case studiesVideo

31

Lonce Wyse
National Univ. of Singapore

Sergi Jordà (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Audio and Interaction through the BrowserVideo

 

Nov

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

Dimitris Kugiumtzis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Ralph Andrzejak (NTSA)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Time series, connectivity and networksVideo

13 (Wed)

Bob L. Sturm
Aalborg University

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

The crisis of evaluation in MIR

14

Felipe Calderero
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (GPI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Recovering relative depth from low-level features without explicit T-junction detection and interpretationVideo

21

Tammo Delhaas 
University of Maastricht

Bart Bijnens (PhySense)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

SIT happens...but doesn't pose problems

22 (Fri)

Jean-Julien Acouturier
Temple University, Japan

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

Spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs): a biologically-plausible alternative to MFCCs?

27 (Wed)

Thomas Wosch
University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt

Perfecto Herrera (MTG)

Room 52.S29 
3:30pm

Introduction to music therapy and use of ICT in music therapy diagnostic

28

Gonzalo Vázquez Vilar
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (ITC)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Sub-Nyquist SamplingVideo

 

Dec

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

5

Germund Hesslow
Lund University

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

Room 55.410 
11:00am

Pavlovian conditioning of motor responses. What do we know about the physiology?

12

 

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19

 

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26

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

2

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

9

Gabriele Facciolo 
ENS Cachan, France

Coloma Ballester (GPI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Reproducible Research, IPOL, and Satellite Stereo ImagePDF

16

Julián Urbano 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Evaluation in (Music) Information Retrieval through the Audio Music Similarity taskVideo

21 (Tue)

Gustavo Deco
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (CNS)

Room 52.019 
10:30-12:30 (2 hours)

Linking the Functional and Structural Human Connectome

23

Juan Alvarez de Lara
Seed and Click

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

New Ways of Financing: Crowdfunding and business angelsVideo

30

 

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Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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Feb

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

4 (Tue)

Jérôme Noailly
IBEC

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 52.321 
10:30-12:30 (2 hours)

In silico integration of biomechanical and biophysical models to explore musculoskeletal diseases

6

Ana Baiges and Anna Magre
UPF Library Services

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Scientific Dissemination, Online Repositories, and Author's RightsVideoPDF

13

Miriam Redi
Yahoo! Research

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Can Machines Like and Understand Pictures?Video

18 (Tue)

James Sharpe
Centre de Regulació Genòmica

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 52.223 
10:30-12:30 (2 hours)

Data-driven multiscale modelling of organogenesis

20

Malcolm Bain
id law partners

Emilia Gómez (MTG)

Room 55.309, 3:30pm

IPR in the XXI Century – are we doing it right?Video

25 (Tue)

Mariano Vázquez
Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC)

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 52.223 
10:30-12:30 (2 hours)

HPC-based cardiovascular simulations

27

Pablo Serrano
UC3M, Madrid

Jaume Barcelo (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Greening (Heterogeneous) Wireless Networks: Overview and Future Directions

 

Mar

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

4 (Tue)

Paula Rudenick
Hospital de la Vall d'Hebron and UPF

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 52.321 
9:30-11:30 (2 hours)

Multidimensional approaches for modelling cardiovascular haemodynamics

6

Mariano Alcañiz
LabHuman, UPV

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Objective techniques for presence measurement in virtual environments by means of brain activity analysisVideo

13

Antoni Buades 
Universitat de les Illes Balears

Gloria Haro (GPI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

A Nonlocal Variational Model for Pansharpening Image FusionVideo

20

Boris Bellalta
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Next-Generation Wireless Networks: 2020 - 2030

26 (Wed)

Gloria Haro
UPF-DTIC

Inernal Speaker (GPI)

Room 55.410, 3:30pm

Image processing and computer vision techniques for digital post-production, image enhancement, and 3D reconstruction

27

Ernest Montbrió 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (CNS)

Room 55.410, 3:30pm

Dynamics of large populations of interacting cells: Collective synchronization and other forms of self-organization in complex systems.

 

Apr

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

2 (Wed)

Horacio Saggion
UPF-DTIC

Inernal Speaker (TALN)

Room 55.410
3:00 pm

Inducing Templates from Concise Summaries

3

Olivier Van Laere
Yahoo! Research

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Find me if you can: predicting geographical coordinates from unstructured textVideo

10

Mehdi Molkaraie

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Partition Function of the Ising Model via Factor Graph Duality

11 (Fri)

Alexis Roche
Siemens Healthcare
Lausane, Switzerland

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

Room 55.410
3:30 pm

Statistical modeling and inference in brain image processing

17

 

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24

Luca Bonatti
UPF-DTIC (CBC)

Internal Speaker (RICO)

Room 55.309, 3:30pm

Rational reasoning in an infant mind

25 (Fri)

Arrate Muñoz Barrutia
University of Navarra

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

Room 55.410
3:30 pm

About lung cancer, one cell at a time.

 

May

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1

 

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5 (Mon)

Yue Zhang
Singapore University of Technology and Design

Leo Wanner (TALN)

Room 55.410
3:30 pm

Syntax-based word ordering: a learning-guided-search approach

8

Subhrakanti Dey
Uppsala University

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Throughput Scaling Laws for Undelay Cognitive Multiple Access ChannelsVideo

15

Vicenç Gómez 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (AI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Some fundamental topics on machine learning and applications

22

Manel Simon
Manduka Games

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Wearable Gaming. Sustainable R+D+i

27 (Tue)

Gemma Àlvarez Cruellas 
UPF Library Services

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 54.021 (Tallers)
3:30pm
REGISTER HERE!!!

Mendeley Workshop

29

Sergio Sayago
UC3M

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Ethical aspects in research involving human participants in ICTs: questions to live with and an ongoing mindsetVideo

30 (Fri)

Alejandro Ribés Cortés
EDF - Electricité de France

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

Room 52.S27
3:30 pm

In-situ Analysis and Visualization for Large Fluid Mechanics Simulations: Visual Coprocessing and Parametric Statistical Studies for Code_Saturne

 

Jun

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

5

Miguel-Angel Otaduy 
URJC, Madrid

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Modeling and Animation of Complex Mechanical Phenomena - Looking for the Right Models and Algorithms

11 (Wed)

Thomas Pengo
Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona

Miguel Ángel González Ballester (SIMBioSys)

Room 55.410
10:00 am

Observing life with computers. Where biology, optics and computer science meet

12

Sergi Valverde
CEXS, UPF

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Networks in Action: Communication, Computation and EvolutionVideo

19

 

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26

Carlos Alberto Figueroa
University of Michigan and King's College

Bart Bijnens (PhySense)

Room 52.S27
4:00 pm

Advances in 3D Blood flow Simulation: Methods and Clinical Applications

30 (Mon)

Carlos H. Muravchik
La Plata National University, Argentina

Federico Sukno(CMTech)

Room 52.S27​
10:30 am

Some results on EIT conductivity-change tracking and the effect of a subdural grid on scalp EEG

Sep

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

26 (Wed)

Gert Lanckriet
University of California, San Diego

Emilia Gómez (MTG)

Room 52.421
12:00pm

Music Recommendation with Multi-Modal Metric Learning to Rank

27

 

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Oct

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

4

Gautham J. Mysore
Adobe's Advanced Technology Labs, San Francisco

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Non-negative Hidden Markov Modeling of Audio

11

Vladimir Estivill-Castro
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and model-checking of software for embedded systems by sequential scheduling of vectors of logic-labelled finite-state machines

16 (Tue)

Annalu Waller
University of Dundee

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

Room 55.309
12:30pm

Augmentative and Alternative Communication across the Lifespan of Individuals with Complex Communication Needs.PDF

16 (Tue)

Irina Bocharova 
St. Petersburg University of Information Technologies

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 55.309
3:30pm

Woven graph codes

18

 

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Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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23 (Tue)

Thippur V. Sreenivas
Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.309
3:30pm

Stochastic approaches to music/speech modeling

25

 

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---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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Nov

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1

 

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---

 

8

Nicolas Duchateau 
Hospital Clínic

Bart Bijnens (PhySense)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Insights into manifold learning. Application to the characterization of pathological deviations from normality.PDF

15

Helena Ramalhinho Dias Lourenço
UPF Dept. of Economics and Business

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Cut-cliques in a market networkVideo

22

Dan Stowell
Queen Mary University of London

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Tracking multiple intermittent sources in noise: inferring a mixture of Markov renewal processesVideo

29

Martin Olsen
AU Herning, Denmark

Vladimir Estivill-Castro (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

On Defining and Computing CommunitiesVideoPDF

 

Dec

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

6

 

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13

 

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20

 

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27

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

10

Uri Nieto
MARL, NYU

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Music Structure Analysis using Matrix FactorizationVideoPDF

11 (Fri)

Deborah Tatar
Virginia Tech

Davinia Hernandez-Leo (GTI)

Room 55.410
12pm

Microcoordination: a lens for studying the design of collaborative phenomena

17

Giorgio Brajnik
University of Udine

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Action-driven design of user interfacesVideo

24

Geoffroy Peeters
IRCAM, Paris

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Annotated MIR Corpora, MSSE search engine for music, Perceptual TempoVideo

31

Joan Melià Seguí
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (UbiCA Lab)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

UbiCA Lab and the Foursquare User Modeling research projectVideo

 

Feb

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

Bill Verplank
Stanford University

Sergi Jorda (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Sketching Metaphors

14

Jordi Janer
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Methods for Music Signal Source Separation of professionally produced recordingsVideo

15 (Fri)

Fernando De la Torre
Carnegie Mellon University

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 55.309
12pm

Component Analysis for Human Sensing

21

Xerxes Arsiwalla
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (SPECS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The Human Brain Connectome and Information ComplexityVideo

25 (Mon)

Federico Sukno
Dublin City University

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 55.410
11:30am

Rotationally Invariant 3D Shape Contexts Using Asymmetry Patterns - Modeling craniofacial landmarks

28

Christian Müller
DFKI and White_C

Leo Wanner (TALN)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Intelligent Multimodal Interfaces for Automotive ApplicationsVideo

 

Mar

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

Edzard Höfig
Freie Universität, Berlin

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Trustworthiness of Open Data Heritage InformationVideo

14

Mohammad Ghavamzadeh
INRIA, Lille

Anders Jonsson (AIG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Two Adaptive Resource Allocation ProblemsVideo

21

 

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28

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Apr

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

4

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

11

Vesna Prčkovska 
IDIBAPS

Gemma Piella (CISTIB)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Diffusion Weighted Imaging and its applicationsVideo

16 (Tue)

Joaquín Míguez
UC3M

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 55.309
11:30am

Particle Filtering

18

Nadia Berthouse
University College London

Narcis Pares (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Body Movement and touch behaviour as means to recognize and enhance affective experienceVideo

22 (Mon)

Zoran Cvektovic 
King's College London

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 55.309
12:00pm

Some Recent Advances in Audio and Speech Technologies

24 (Wed)

Miguel Ángel González Ballester
Alma IT Systems

Oscar Camara (PhySense)

Room 52.S31
12:00pm

Translational research in medical imaging and computer-assisted surgery: from basic science to the market

25

Fabien Gouyon
INESC Porto

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Are we there yet?! A critical take on some Music Information Retrieval technologies.Video

26 (Fri)

Henkjan Honing
University of Amsterdam

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.309
3:30pm

Music, Cognition and the Origins of Musicality

29 (Mon)

Saira Mian
LBNL, Berkeley

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas (ITC)

Room 55.309
11:00am

Resource-constrained communication and computing

 

May

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

2

Oriol Pujol Vila
UB

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Deep architectures for machine learning.Video

8 (Wed)

Justin Salamon
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 55.410
3:30pm

Even a Geek can Speak: the DO's and DONT's of giving a presentation

9

Oscar Corcho
UPM

Leo Wanner (TALN)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

An ontological model to preserve scientific experimentsVideo

16

Jordi Navarra
Fundació Sant Joan de Déu

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Temporal & spatial re-encoding of soundVideo

21 (Tue)

Thomas Voegtlin
INRIA

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

Room 52.S25
12:00pm

Time codes, oscillations and neuronal response properties

23

Carlos Mosquera 
University of Vigo

Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Link Performance Evaluation in Communications: Show me the ErrorsVideo

27 (Mon)

Alex Roxin
Centre de Recerca Matemàtica

Gustavo Decco (CNS)

Room 55.410
11:30am

Complex Networks: Structure and Function

30

Boris Bellalta 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Gigabit WLANs: IEEE 802.11acVideoPDF

 

Jun

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3 (Mon)

Joan Solà
isardSAT

Hector Geffner (AI)

Room 52.S25
11:00am

Real time visual motion estimation and scene reconstruction for mobile robots

3 (Mon)

Xavier Carreras
UPC

Miguel Ballesteros (TALN)

Room 55.410
3:30pm

Rich Dependency-based Representations of Natural Language Syntax

6

Piet Claus
KU Leuven

Bart Bijnens (PhySense)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Remodeling in cardiovascular disease, combining animal and mathematical modelsVideo

13

Julio José Carabias Orti
University of Jaén

Jordi Janer (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

RealTime Audio to Score Alignment System using Spectral Factorization and Online Time WarpingVideo

20

 

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---

 

 

---

 

27

 

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---

 

top

Oct

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

6

Azadeh Faridi

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Introduction to Research SeminarsPDF

13

Waldo Nogueira Vazquez 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Signal Processing and Sound Perception with Cochlear Implants

20

Tobias Koch 
University of Cambridge

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

At Low SNR Asymmetric Quantizers Are Better

27

Bart Bijnens
UPF-DTIC

ICREA researcher

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The aortic wall and flow properties: what do we want to quantify and how do we approach it?

 

Nov

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3

Ingmar Weber 
Yahoo! Research

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

What and How Children Search on the WebPPT

10

Andruid Kerne 
Texas A&M

Sergi Jorda (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Human-Centered Computing for Creativity and Expression

17

Jossy Sayir 
University of Cambridge

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The SUDOKU Coding Project

24

Jordi Vallverdú 
UAB

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Artificial Emotions: A Historical and Conceptual Review

 

Dec

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1

Stephan Pfletschinger
CTTC

Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Non-binary Coding for Multiple Antennas

8

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

13

Yi-Hsuan Yang 
Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Perfecto Herrera (MTG)

Room 52.S31 
12:30pm

Dimensional Music Emotion Recognition

15

 

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22

 

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---

 

 

---

 

29

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

5

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

12

Albert Guillén i Fàbregas 
UPF-DTIC

ICREA researcher

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Extremes of Error Exponents

19

 

---

 

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

---

 

26

Simon Oechsner
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Locality-Awareness in BitTorrent

 

Feb

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title


(Wed)

Christopher Mellish 
University of Aberdeen

Leo Wanner (NLP)

Room 52.221, 3:30pm

The Semantic Web: Ultimate Application for Natural Language Generation?

2

 

---

 

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

---

 

9

Joost Van de Weije 
UAB

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Color Image Understanding in the Presence of Shadows and Specularities

10 
(Fri)

Cédric Mesnage
University of Lugano

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.410
1:00pm

Social Shuffle

13 
(Mon)

Marta Plana
CMT

Miquel Oliver (NeTS) and Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 55.309, 3:30pm

Regulation in Telecommunications -- The European Experience

16

David Morales 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The diagonal of complex Wishart matrices and its application to the analysis of MIMO systems

21 
(Tue)

Volker Hohmann 
Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg, Germany

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.410 
12:00pm

Trends in hearing device technology

23

Markus Schedl 
Johannes Kepler University (JKU), Linz

Emilia Gómez (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Geo-Aware Music Information Extraction from Social MediaPDF

 

Mar

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

1

Jorge Lobo 
IBM Research

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Distributed State Machines


(Fri)

Andre Holzapfel 
INESC Porto

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.410 
4:00pm

Selective sampling for beat tracking evaluation

8

 

---

 

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

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(Fri)

Sean Hill 
INCF, Sweden

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

Room 55.410 
12:00pm

Toward a global collaborative research infrastructure for neuroscience

15

Luc Steels 
IBE (UPF-CSIC) 
Sony Computer Science Lab, Paris.

Horacio Saggion (TALN)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Can autonomous robots invent their own language?

22

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

29

 

---

 

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Apr

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

5

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

12

Jorge Infante 
CMT

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Regulation of international roaming in the European Union: lessons learned

19

Francesc Moreno 
CSIC-UPC

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Linear Formulations for Rigid and Non-Rigid 2D-to-3D Registration

26

Maria Vanrell Martorell
UAB

Emilia Gómez (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Perception-based representations for computational colour

 

May

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

3

Natàlia Plancheria and Sílvia Losa 
UPF Library Services

Aurelio Ruiz

Room 52.321, 3:30pmTalk in Spanish with slides in English.

Scientific dissemination, online repositories, and author's rightsPDF


(Tue)

Edoardo Provenzi 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (GPI)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

Variational methods in image processing


(Wed)

Davinia Hernández-Leo
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (GTI)

Room 55.410 
12:30pm

Technologies to enhance collaborative learning across multiple activities, tools, and spaces

10

Alex Bikfalvi
UC3M

Jaume Barcelo (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Peer-to-Peer Television for IMS-based Next Generation Networks

17

Nikolaos Makriyannis
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Multi-Party Computation and Fairness

18 
(Fri)

Jônatas Manzolli
UNICAMP, Brazil

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

Composition Dialoging with Technological Interfaces: an Interdisciplinary Research Framework

23 
(Wed)

Johanna Moore
University of Edinburgh

Leo Wanner (NLP)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

Natural Language Interaction with Human and Computer Tutors

24

Rodrigo Oliveira
Telefonica Research

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Human-Computer Persuasive Interaction: Designing the emotional bond with customers

29
(Tue)

Antoine Liutkus
Telecom Paristech

Jordi Janer (MTG)

Room 55.410 
3:30pm

Adaptive Filtering for Music/Voice Separation Exploiting the Repeating Musical Structure

30
(Wed)

Emilia Gómez 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 55.410 
4pm

Audio Signal Analysis for Computational Music Listening

31

Laura Dempere 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (CNS)

Room 55.410 
12:30pm

The study of visual search at the interface of computer vision and computational neuroscience

Komal Florio 
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker (WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The Italian overnight money market: a financial application of network analysis.

 

Jun

Speaker

Host/Group

Remarks

Title

7

Nick Collins 
University of Sussex

Perfecto Herrera (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Machine listening and learning for musical systems


(Fri)

Pedro Vera Candeas andFrancisco Jesús Cañadas Quesada
Universidad de Jaén

Emilia Gomez (MTG)

Room 55.410 
11am

Percussive/Harmonic/Singing Separation on Monaural Music Signals

14

Bipin Indurkhya
IIT Hyderabad

Perfecto Herrera (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Perceptual Similarity, Visual Metaphor and Creativity

21

 

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28

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

Sep

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

23

Azadeh Faridi

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Introduction to Research SeminarsPDF

30

 

---

 

 

---

 

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

 

---

 

 

 

Oct

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

7

Frederic Leymarie 
University of London, Goldsmiths College

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Shape Revisited: Beyond Marr

8 (Fri)

Frederic Leymarie 
University of London, Goldsmiths College

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.219
12:00pm

FormGrow, FoldGrow, FoldSynth: 3 steps in an art-science collaboration

14

Sergi Jorda 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Tangible and Tabletop Interaction Research at the Music Technology Group (UPF)

21

Mariano Consens 
Univ. of Toronto

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Interlinking and Usage Exploration in the Linked Open Data Cloud

28

Xavier Gelabert 
iTEAM-UPV

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Cognitive Radio Enabling Opportunistic Spectrum Access (OSA): Challenges and Modelling ApproachesPDF

29 (Fri)

John R. Kender 
Columbia University

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
12:00pm

Video Genetics: A Case Study from YouTube

 

Nov

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Oscar Tomico 
Eindhoven University of Technology

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Situated media

11

Enric Guaus 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Analyzing left hand fingering in guitar playing

18

Alfonso Martinez 
CWI, The Netherlands

Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Some results on the information-theoretic analysis of mismatched decoding

25

Johan Zuidweg 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Mobile Applications Research

26 (Fri)

Ralph Andrzejak 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (CNS)

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
12:00pm

Nonlinear signal analysis - Basic principles and applications to neurophysiological recordings

 

Dec

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

Narcís Parés 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Research Program Report

3 (Fri)

Jesús Bisbal 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (CISTIB)

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
12:00pm

Inference and Discovery through Multimodal Biomedical data

9

Sergi Jordà 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Tangible and Tabletop Interaction Research at the Music Technology Group (UPF)

16

 

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23

 

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30

 

---

 

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

Jan

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

6

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

13

Jordi Janer 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Soundscape modeling: description and generation using unstructured sound databasesWebPDF

20

Alejandro Frangi 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (CISTIB)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

The Virtual Physiological Human Initiative: concept, examples, challenges and opportunities

27

Jordi Freixenet 
Universitat de Girona

Alejandro Frangi (CISTIB)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Between the breast and the prostate

 

Feb

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

3

Xavier Serra 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Computational models for the discovery of the world's musicPDF

10

Emmanuel Vincent 
INRIA Rennes

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

A flexible framework for audio source separation

17

Alun Evans 
UPF, DTIC

Internal speaker (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Barcelona World Race: The Game - Combining Videogames with real sporting events

24

Vladimir Estivill-Castro
UPF, DTIC

Internal Speaker

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Engineering the behavior of Robots: A project in intelligent integrated systems

 

Mar

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

3

Daniel Gatica-Perez 
Idiap Research Institute, Switzerland

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG &Yahoo! Research)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Reality Mining for Real: Large-Scale Human Behavior and Smartphone Data

10

Arnau Ramisa
IRI-UPC

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Efficient Object Pixel-Level Categorization using Bags of Features

17

Anton Dries
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Vladimir Estivill-Castro

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Towards an inductive database for information networks

24

Meinard Müller 
Max Planck Institute for Informatics

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

New Developments in Music Signal Processing

31

 

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---

 

 

---

 

 

---

 

 

Apr

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5 (Tue)

Guiseppe Contissa
European University Institute

Leo Wanner (NLP)

Room 52.117 
12:30pm

Temporal Dimensions in Rule Modelling for Legal Reasoning

7

Zbigniew Ras 
University of North Carolina, Charlotte & Warsaw University of Technology

Perfecto Herrera (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Cascade classifiers for automatic music indexing

14

Marcos Faundez Zanuy 
UPC

Xavier Binefa (CMTech)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Biometric recognition by means of online signature and handwriting

21

 

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---

 

 

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28

Julio Gonzalo 
UNED

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (WRG &Yahoo! Research)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Web People Search: a case study in evaluation design as research driver in Human Language Technologies (with bonus insights on why spies refuse to use the F measure)

 

May

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

3 (Tue)

Boris Rubinsky 
University of California at Berkeley

Antoni Ivorra

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
12:30pm

Bioengineering for the Economically Disadvantaged

5

Christian Rummel 
University of Bern, Switzerland

Ralph Andrzejak (CNS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Epilepsy surgery and quantitative EEG analysis

11 (Wed)

Oscar Camara 
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (CISTIB)

Room 52.S31 
12:30pm

Image processing tools and personalization of computational models in clinical applications

12

Vanesa Daza 
UPF-DTIC

Internal speaker (WiCom)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Distributed Cryptography for Securing Emerging Wireless Sensor Networks

19

Israel Martín Escalona 
UPC

Boris Bellalta (NeTS)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Location in ad hoc networks

26

Eduardo Graells 
UPF-DTIC

Internal speaker (WRG &Yahoo! Research)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

A Hatching Algorithm for Animated Objects in Object Space

31 (Tue)

Dirk Staehle 
University of Würzburg

Boris Bellalta (NeTS)

Room TBA 
12:30pm

Application and QoE Aware Resource Management and Machine Type Communication

 

Jun

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

Rossi Setchi 
Cardiff School of Engineering

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Semantic Indexing and Retrieval of Images

9

Mathieu Bosi
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Beyond the 2D surface of the Reactable

14 (Tue)

Ajay Kapur 
California Institute of the Arts

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
3:30pm

21st Century Raga: Digitizing North Indian Music

16

Jean Mary Zarate 
NYU

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

Room 52.321, 3:30pm

Musical tasks: testing the brain's dorsal auditory stream

21(Tue)

Parag Chordia 
Georgia Institute of Technology

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 55.309 (Tanger)
12:00pm

Computational Modeling of North Indian Classical Music

23

 

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28 (Tue)

Jim Foley 
Georgia Tech College of Computing

Alun Evans (GTI)

Room 52.327 
4:00pm

Experimental comparison of Blended E-learning and traditional classroom instruction

30

John Cook 
London Metropolitan University

Davinia Hernández-Leo (GTI
Part of Jornada Cibernàrium de divulgació tecnològica

3:30pm 
Mediatic - 1st floor auditorium (c/ Roc Boronat 117)

Putting Learning into Context with Mobile Devices



 

Oct

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

1

Azadeh Faridi

 

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Room 52.321

Introduction to Research SeminarsPDF

8

Oscar Pablo Di Liscia
Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Argentina

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321

Research on Pitch-class composition in the pd environment

15

 

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22

Ulf Brefeld 
Yahoo! Research, Barcelona

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321

Machine Learning Potpourri - Semi-supervised Learning, Learning with Multiple Kernels, and Network Intrusion DetectionPDF

29

Sian Lindley 
Microsoft Research Cambridge

Autelic Strategies Workshop 2009

Room Auditorium
4:00pm

Inspiring Design For Older Adults: Values, Relationships and Routine
ppt

Sergio Sayago 
GTI, UPF

Autelic Strategies Workshop 2009

Room Auditorium
4:30pm

Human-Computer Interaction with Older People: From Factors to Social Actors
ppt

 

Nov

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5

Roy Kerckhoffs 
UCSD

Alejandro Frangi (CISTIB)

Room 52.321
11:30am

Multi-scale modeling of the dyssynchronous failing heartPDF

12

Zulima Saenz
France Telecom España

Johan Zuidweg (NeTS)

Room 52.321

Orange and Wikimedia projectsPDF

19

 

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Room 52.321

 

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26

Ingmar Weber 
Yahoo! Research, Barcelona

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321
Special Seminar

Rethinking the ESP Gameppt

 

Dec

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

3

Stefan Bilbao
University of Edinburgh

Hendrik Purwins (MTG)

Room 52.321

Numerical Sound Synthesis

10

 

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Room 52.321

 

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17

 

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Room 52.321

 

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24

 

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Room 52.321

 

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31

 

---

 

 

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Room 52.321

 

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Jan

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

7

 

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Room 52.321

 

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14

Emma Muñoz Moreno 
UPF-DTIC

Internal speaker from CISTIB

Room 52.321

Visualization and Processing of Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Images

21

Xavier Amatriain 
Telefonica Research

Azadeh Faridi

Room 52.321

User-driven approach to Recommender Systems

28

Karl Fritscher 
UMIT, Austria

Alejandro Frangi (CISTIB)

Room 52.321

Statistical models of shape and appearance in medical imaging

 

Feb

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Gérard Assayag 
Ircam - CNRS UMR 9912

Sergi Jorda (MTG)

Room 52.321

The Music Representation Team at Ircam

11

Meritxell Bach 
EPFL, Switzerland

Mathieu De Craene (CISTIB)

Room 52.321

Image Processing techniques in the Signal Processing Core - CHUV antenna: segmentation and registration of medical images.

18

Marta Mattoso 
COPPE, UFRJ, Brazil

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321

A non-intrusive approach to distributed and parallel database query processing

25

Antoni Ivorra 
UPF-DTIC

Internal speaker

Room 52.321
Special Seminar

Electrodes and sensors for health

 

Mar

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Bettina Berendt
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321

Diversity in search: what, how, and what for?

11

Julián David Morillo Pozo 
UPC

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

Room 52.321

Improving wireless networks with cooperative protocols

18

 

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Room 52.321

 

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25

 

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Room 52.321

 

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Apr

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

1

 

---

 

 

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Room 52.321

 

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8

Adrià Pérez 
University of Dundee

Mathieu De Craene (CISTIB)

Room 52.321

Deformable registration of retinal FA sequences

15

Bernd Bohnet 
UPF-DTIC

Leo Wanner (NLP)

Room 52.321

Parallel Accurate Dependency Parsing with a Hash KernelPDF

22

Eduard Gomà

Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 52.321

ClubADSL: When your neighbours are your friends

29

Anthony Ephremides 
University of Maryland, USA

Angel Lozano (WiCom)

Room 52.321

Simply Cooperativeppt

 

May

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

6

Jonatas Manzolli
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil

Paul Verschure (SPECS)

Room 52.321

Modelling Music Creativity: an Interdisciplianry Approach

13

Kim Gerdes 
University of Paris III 
(Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Leo Wanner (NLP)

Room 52.321

Checking Grammar: Why we need to parse deeply

20

Sergio Sayago
UPF-DTIC

Internal Speaker from GTI

Room 52.321
Special Seminar

Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction with Older PeoplePDF

27

Juan Luis Abadia 
UPF

Internal Speaker from GTI

Room 52.321

Augmented Reality in Video Games

 

 

Jun

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

3

Maria Victoria Sanchez Vives
ICREA and IDIBAPS, Barcelona

Gustavo Deco (CNS)

Room 52.321

Cortical Rhythmic Emergent Activity: Mechanisms and Impact on Information Transmission

10

Winslow Burleson 
Arizona State University

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room 52.321
2:00pm

Motivational Environments: Advancing Learning, Creativity, and Exploration

17

 

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Room 52.321

 

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24

 

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Room 52.321

 

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p. 08

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

25

Azadeh Faridi

 

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França 102

A short introduction to research seminars [slides in pdf]

 

Oct. 08

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

Darrell Conklin 
City University London

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

França Auditorium

Discovery of Distinctive Patterns in Music

7 (Tue)

Sandra Zilles 
University of Alberta

Hector Geffner (AI)

França Auditorium 
12:00-14:00

Sample-efficient cooperative teaching and learning

9

Sape Mullender 
Bell Labs Antwerp

Angel Lozano

França 102

Programming with Threads

16

Maria G. Papadopouli 
University of Crete

Dolors Sala (NetCom)

França Auditorium

Accurate and scalable models of wireless user workload

17 (Fri)

Rodrigo Paredes
University of A Coruña

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

França 102
12:30-14:00

On Sorting, Heaps and Minimum Spanning Trees

23

Domenico Giustiniano
Telefonica Research

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

França Auditorium

On the side-effects of proprietary solutions for fading and interference mitigation in IEEE 802.11b/g outdoor links

30

Apichat Heednacram 
Griffith University, Australia

Vladimir Estivill-Castro (WRG)

França Auditorium

FPT Algorithms for Line Cover and Minimum Bends TSP

 

Nov. 08

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

6

Sergi Jorda 
UPF

MTG internal seminar

França Auditorium 
*Special Seminar*

Tangible and tabletop interaction: concepts, overview, applications

13

Vladimir Estivill-Castro
UPF

WRG Internal seminar

França Auditorium

Robots for People --- A project in Intelligent Integrated Systems

20

Vladimir Estivill-Castro
UPF

WRG Internal seminar

França 102

Privacy-Preserving Data Mining

27

Emilia Gómez 
UPF

MTG internal seminar

França 102

Music Analysis, Similarity and Classification based on Chroma Features: Examples of the Study of Flamenco Music

 

Dec. 08

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Mathieu Lacage
INRIA, France

Dolors Sala (NetCom)

No-lecture day 
França Auditorium

A Progress Report on the ns-3 Network Simulator[slides in pdf]

9

Masataka Goto
AIST, Japan

Xavier Serra (MTG)

França Auditorium 
11:00-13:00

Active Music Listening Interfaces Based on Music-Understanding Technologies

11

Horacio Saggion 
University of Sheffield, UK

Leo Wanner (NLP)

França Auditorium

Information Extraction and Summarization for Information Access

18

 

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25

 

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Jan. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

1

 

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8

Robert Castelo 
Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, UPF

Hector Geffner (AI)

new location: 
(new campus)

Learning graphical Markov models from high-dimensional data sets with qp-graphs and its application to molecular regulatory network modeling.

15

 

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22

Daniel Erro 
Aholab, University of the Basque Country

Xavier Serra (MTG)

França Auditorium

Voice conversion: state of the art, recent improvements and remaining challenges

29

Pedro Garcia Lopez 
Universitat Rovira i Virgili

Josep Blat (GTI)

52.321 (new campus)

SocialDNS: Free Domains for a Free Internet
[slides in pdf]

 

Feb. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5

 

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12

Johan Sundberg
Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, KTH

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321

The voice as a music instrument

13 (Fri)

Michael Buro
University of Alberta

Hector Geffner (AI)

12:00-14:00
Room 52.323

Planning in Real-Time Strategy Games

19

Eric Figueras Torras
Amivox Ltd.

Angel Lozano

Room 52.321

Entrepreneurship in mobile communications

20 (Fri)

Oren Zuckerman
MIT Media Lab

Narcís Parés (EIC)

11:00-13:00 
Room 52.325

Design and Evaluation of a Physical/Digital Simulation Environment for Children

26

Volker Hohmann 
Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg, Germany

Xavier Serra (MTG)

3:15 pm
Room 52.321

Model-based signal processing for hearing aids

 

Mar. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

5

 

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12

Hugo Zaragoza
Yahoo! Research, Barcelona

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room: 52.321

Correlator: things we did, things we should do, and things we don't know how to.

16 (Mon)

Nicolas Obin
IRCAM, Paris

Xavier Serra (MTG)

1pm 
Room: 55.410

Analysis and Synthesis of French Prosody for Artistic Purpose

19

Sergey Gorinsky 
Washington University in St. Louis

Josep Blat (GTI)

Room: 52.321

Innovating the Multi-Provider Internet

26

 

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30 (Mon)

Maria Paloma Díaz Pérez 
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Josep Blat (GTI)

4pm 
Room 52.423

On the use of web design patterns

31 (Tue)

Marco Viceconti
Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

Josep Blat (GTI)

3pm 
Room 52.321

The Virtual Physiological Human: status and perspectives for musculoskeletal diseases

 

Apr. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

2

 

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9

 

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No-lecture day

 

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16

Mischa Dohler 
CTTC Barcelona

Angel Lozano

Room 52.321

The Internet of Things Goes Wireless

23

 

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Happy Sant Jordi! 

 

 

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30

Jessica Grahn
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK

Rafael Ramirez (MTG)

Room 52.321

Rhythm processing in the brain: a focus on motor areas

 

May. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

6 (Wed)

Bettina Berendt
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

12:30 
Room 52.321

Is a graph worth a thousand words? Visual Web mining for story understanding and search

7

Michal Wrona 
University of Wroclaw

Hubie Chen (AI)

Room 52.321

Quantified Positive Temporal Constraints

14

Jonatas Manzolli
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil

Narcís Parés (EIC & SPECS)

Room 52.321

Music Creativity Dialoging with Technology: an Interdisciplinary Research Framework

21

Simon Penny
University of California, Irvine, USA

Narcís Parés (EIC & SPECS)

Room 52.213

Building systems for Embodied Cultural Cognition: aesthetic, design and technical challenges.

26 (Tue)

Marc Sanchez
Universitat Rovira i Virgili

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

11:30 
Room 52.421

Biased peer-to-peer overlay construction: an opportunity for the ISPs

28

Mounia Lalmas 
University of Glasgow, UK

Ricardo Baeza-Yates (Yahoo! Research & WRG)

Room 52.321

Understanding aggregated searc

 

Jun. 09

Speaker

Host

Remarks

Title

4

Bob L. Sturm
Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room 52.321

Sparse Approximation and Some of its Applications to Analysis, Visualization, and Transformation of Acoustic and Musical Signals

11

Marc Ciurana Adell 
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC)

Miquel Oliver (NeTS)

10:30-12:00 
Room 52.423

Location of WLAN devices using Time of Arrival

18

Vanesa Daza 
UPF

Internal seminar (WiCom)

Room 52.327 
*Special Seminar*

Sharing secrets from A to Z

25

 

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29 (Mon)

George Tzanetakis
University of Victoria, Canada

Xavier Serra (MTG)

Room: 52.210

Computational Ethnomusicology - Expanding the reach of Music Information Retrieval to the musics