June

June, 22nd 2017

16:00

Auditorium

Invited Research Seminar

Intrinsic Coupling Modes and Cognition

by Prof. Dr. Andreas K. Engel

Hosted by: Gustavo Deco

Abstract

Intrinsic coupling constitutes a key feature of ongoing brain activity, which exhibits rich spatiotemporal patterning and contains information that influences cognitive processing. I will discuss evidence for two distinct types of intrinsic coupling modes which seem to reflect the operation of different coupling mechanisms. One type arises from phase coupling of band-limited oscillatory signals, whereas the other results from coupled aperiodic fluctuations of signal envelopes. The two coupling modes differ in their dynamics, their origins, their putative functions and with respect to their alteration in neuropsychiatric disorders. I will propose that the concept of intrinsic coupling modes can provide a framework for capturing the dynamics of intrinsically generated neuronal interactions at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

Biography

Andreas K. Engel studied medicine and philosophy at Saarland University, Homburg, at the Technical University of Munich, and at the Goethe University Frankfurt in Germany. Having completed his medical exams, he obtained his doctorate (Dr. med.) from the Technical University Munich in 1987. Between 1987-1995 he worked as a post-doctoral fellow with Wolf Singer at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany. From 1996-2000, Engel headed a research group at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research which was funded by the Heisenberg Program of the German Research Foundation (DFG). Between fall 1997 and summer 1998, he also was affiliated as a Daimler-Benz Fellow to the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study. From 2000-2002, he worked at the Jülich Research Centre as head of the Cellular Neurobiology Group at the Institute for Medicine. In 2002, he was appointed to the Chair of Neurophysiology at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Engel is a member of the Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg. Since 2011, he is the coordinator of Collaborative Research Centre SFB 936 „Multi-Site Communication in the Brain“ (with C. Gerloff, Dept. of Neurology, UKE). In 2011, Engel received an ERC Advanced Grant (with P. König, University of Osnabrück, Germany).

June, 27th 2017

15:30

55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Towards Multiple Source Identification in Environmental Audio Streams

by Juan Bello

Hosted by Emilia Gómez

Abstract

Automatic sound source identification is a fundamental task in machine listening with a wide range of applications in environmental sound analysis including the monitoring of urban noise and bird migrations. In this talk I will discuss our efforts at addressing this problem, including data collection, annotation and the systematic exploration of a variety of methods for robust classification. I will discuss how simple feature learning approaches such as spherical k-means significantly outperform off-the-self methods based on MFCC, given large codebooks trained with every possible shift of the input representation. I will show how the size of codebooks, and the need for shifting data, can be reduced by using convolutional filters, first by means of the deep scattering spectrum, and then as part of deep convolutional neural networks.

June, 28th 2017

15:30

55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Analysis/Re-Synthesis of Singing - and Texture Sounds

by Axel Robel. from IRCAM

Hosted by Xavier Serra 

Abstract

This presentation will discuss recent research exploring different approaches to sound synthesis using analysis/re-synthesis methods for singing and sound textures. We will describe Ircam's Singing Synthesis system ISiS integrating two synthesis approaches: A classical phase vocoder based approach and a more innovative deterministic and stochastic decomposition (PaN) based on a pulse and noise model. We will notably discuss the underlying analysis of the glottal pulse parameters as well as some recent approaches to establish high level control of the singing voice quality (Intensity Changes, mouth opening, roughness of the voice). Concerning Sound Texture synthesis we will describe a recent signal representation using
perceptually motivated parameters : envelop statistics in the perceptual bands (McDermott, 2009, 2011, 2013), discuss synthesis methods that allow producing sound signals from these statistical descriptors, and demonstrate some synthesis results not only for analysis synthesis of textures but also the use as effect for the transformation of arbitrary sounds by means of manipulation of these descriptors.

June, 28th 2017

16:30

55.410

Invited Research Seminar

Evolving Music in the Lab and in the Wild

by Mathias Mauch, from Apple and Queen Mary University of London

Hosted by Xavier Serra 

Abstract

Let's revisit music culture through the eye of an evolutionary biologist. Can we evolve music in the lab, like bacteria in a Petri dish? Can we observe how music changes in the wild? I'll be reporting on two data-driven studies I did in collaboration with actual biologists to answer just these questions. On the way I'll be introducing my own background in music informatics and the tools we needed to analyse the audio.

 

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