Past Research Seminars>>
November   
November 22th  
 
15:30 h
 
Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

Introduction to ethical issues in research

By Josep Blat and Marta Rodríguez (CIREP).
 
Abstract

The Institutional Commission for Ethical Review of Projects (CIREP-UPF) established in December 2014 wants to contribute to the improvement within the UPF community, of ethical standards and personal data protection in research activities and academic practices related to human beings.  Among other CIREP is in charge of evaluating research projects subject to ethics review and give its approval by issuing mandatory favourable reports.  The seminar will provide an overview on the key aspects to take into account to guarantee that the research conducted at the department meets the highest international ethical standards.

November 23rd  
 
15:30 h
 
Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

Automatic Assessment of Student Music Performances

By Alexander Lerch, Georgia Institute of Technology


Abstract

While there is large interest in Music Information Retrieval tasks focusing on extracting score-like information such as pitches, chords, and rhythmic properties, less attention is being paid to performance information such as (micro-)tempo, intonation, and dynamics.
This presentation will look at Music Performance Analysis from the perspective of assessing student music performances. The possibilities and limitations of current data-driven approaches to the assessment of middle and high school students will be discussed based on real-world results on a large dataset of graded student recordings.

Biography

Alexander Lerch is Assistant Professor at the Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology, where he leads the music informatics group. He is working on new artificially intelligent technologies for accessing, producing, and listening to music. His main research field is called Music Information Retrieval (MIR), an emerging interdisciplinary field. He is Co-Founder of the company zplane.development, a research-driven technology provider for the music industry. His book “An Introduction to Audio Content Analysis,” published by Wiley/IEEE Press, is used as course text book in multiple institutions.

More: https://www.alexanderlerch.com/

November 26th  
 
15:30 h
 
Room 55.309

PhD Research Seminar

"How do agile practice support organizing a PhD"  

By Eva-Maria Schön
 
Abstract
Working on a PhD is an iterative process. In the beginning, the outcome is not clearly defined and results are delivered in an incremental manner. The characteristics of research work are comparable to the ones of Agile Software Development (ASD). Both domains focus on knowledge work instead of repetitive production activities. Agile methodologies like Scrum, Kanban or Extreme Programming (XP) are composed of best practices known as agile practices and address specific aspects of organizing work with the aim of continuous improvement. This correlation between ASD and research work motivated me to use agile practices for organizing my PhD, since I am a passionate practitioner of the agile movement. The talk reflects my experience as a PhD student and discuss how agile practices were applied for organizing my research work.
 
Biography
Eva-Maria Schön has many years of practical experience in the development of digital products by means of agile product development. She supports teams in continuously improving themselves and reflecting their own working methods. She received the PhD degree in computer science from the University of Seville (Spain) in 2017.

 

November 29th  
 
16:00 h
 
Room 55.309

Invited Research Seminar

How do people explore virtual environments?  

By Belen Masia

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) systems provide a new medium that has the potential to have a significant impact on our society. The experiences offered by these emerging systems are inherently different from radio, television, or theater, opening new directions in research areas such as cinematic VR capture, interaction, or content gener ation and editing. However, the behavior of users who visually explore immersive VR environments is not well understood, nor do statistical models exist to predict this behavior. Yet, with unprecedented capabilities for creating synthetic immersive environments, many important questions arise. How do we design 3D scenes or place cuts in VR videos? How do we drive user attention in virtual environments? Can we predict visual exploration patterns? How can we efficiently compress cinematic VR content?

To address these and other questions from first principles, it is crucial to understand how users explore virtual environments. In this talk, I will go through our work on analyzing user behavior in cinematic VR scenarios.

Biography

Dr. Belen Masia is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at Universidad de Zaragoza, and a member of the Graphics & Imaging Lab of the I3A Institute. Prior to that, she was a postdoctoral researcher at MPI Informatik, and a member of the Max Planck Center for Visual Computing and Communication.

Her research interests span Computational Photography, Computational Displays and Applied Perception. Including: perception of appearance, stereo and multiview displays, light field editing, scene understanding and (simple/low-cost) light source and appearance acquisition and editing.

If the seminar is ofered via streaming in: 

- Room 55.309 or 55.410 follow this link

- Auditorium follow this link

If you are interested in giving a Research Seminar or you would like to invite a speaker please fill in the following form RSDetails Form .