Seminars take place at UPF, Campus Poblenou, Roc Boronat, 138, Barcelona and will only be streamed/recorded if the speaker has granted permission.  Rooms 55.309 / 55.410 streaming / Auditorium streaming 

EiTIC members: If you are interested in giving a Research Seminar or you would like to invite a speaker, please  fill in the following form RSDetails Form

Past Research Seminars

Upcoming Invited and PhD seminars 2020

Seminars have been cancelled and will be reschedule as soon as it is possible

MARCH  

March, 19

 

12.00

 

55.309

Invited Research Seminar

By Petri Toiviainen, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Music Research, University of Jyväskylä

fMRI meets MIR: studying neural correlates of music listening with a naturalistic paradigm

Abstract:

The past two decades have witnessed a surge of neuroimaging studies that have attempted at identify brain structures involved in the perception of music-related perceptual features, such as pitch, sensory dissonance, rhythm, timbre, and key, typically in controlled conditions wherein the feature of interest has been presented in isolation and manipulated artificially. Such studies have inspected phenomena relatively distinct from the actual music listening situation where listeners continuously and subconsciously extract several musical features that are changing and integrate them into coherent percepts. 

To alleviate this shortcoming, our team has introduced and employed a naturalistic paradigm, wherein neural correlates of music processing are investigated using brain imaging data collected during continuous listening of music recordings and modelled using features computationally extracted from the presented music. I will give an overview of this work, including approaches of both encoding neural activation from music and decoding musical content and listener characteristics from neural activation.

I will also present our ongoing work in which we aim to switch from feature engineering to feature learning in order to model the neural correlates of implicit music learning and enculturation. To this end, we will employ unsupervised deep neural networks to learn style-specific musical features at a range of abstraction levels and compare the thus learned representations with neural representations to investigate how music is processed in the brain at different hierarchical levels and how this depends on previous musical exposure.

Host: Xavier Serra Casals

 

March, 19

 

15.30

 

55.309

PhD Research Seminar

By Simone Tassani

Statistical course and Design of Experiments - course composed on 6  2-hour sessions

The course of statistics aims to introduce a number of tools for master/Ph.D. students and post docs. The presented tools will play a role in planning many kind of studies, properly analyse the results and understand if data analysed by other researchers are or not reliable.
Material from last edition available at
https://www.upf.edu/web/mdm-dtic/course-statistics-and-design-of-experiments

Bio:

Dr. Simone Tassani is senior researcher of the Multiscale and Computational Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (MBIOMM) team in the SIMBiosys group.

March, 26

 

15.30

 

55.309

PhD Research Seminar

By Simone Tassani

Statistical course and Design of Experiments - course composed on 6  2-hour sessions

The course of statistics aims to introduce a number of tools for master/Ph.D. students and post docs. The presented tools will play a role in planning many kind of studies, properly analyse the results and understand if data analysed by other researchers are or not reliable.
Material from last edition available at
https://www.upf.edu/web/mdm-dtic/course-statistics-and-design-of-experiments

Bio:

Dr. Simone Tassani is senior researcher of the Multiscale and Computational Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (MBIOMM) team in the SIMBiosys group.

APRIL  

April, 21

 

15.30

 

55.309

Invited Research Seminar

By Jorg Fachner

TBA

Bio:

Dr. Fachner, since 2013 Professor for Music, Health and the Brain at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, UK, is interested in translational issues of interdisciplinary research topics between medicine, humanities and music sciences. Starting in Germany 20 years ago, he has been working as a professional in the field of Music Therapy (MT) and brain research, was and is active in EU and Academy of Finland MT research projects and serves on international MT advisory and policy boards. Studying Music Therapy processes, brain responses and treatment of depression, as well as consciousness states and time perception, his scientific output comprises over 100 publications in journals and books across disciplines. Recent projects, collaborations and publications focus on biomarkers, neurodynamics, timing and kairological principles of the MT process and effectiveness