Erratum: Rising between-workplace inequalities in high-income countries

  • Authors
  • Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald; Rainey, Anthony; Avent-Holt, Dustin; Bandelj, Nina; Boza, István; Cort, David; Godechot, Olivier; Hajdu, Gergely; Hällsten, Martin; Folke Henriksen, Lasse; Skeie Hermansen, Are; Hou Feng; Jung, Jiwook; Kanjuo-Mrela, Aleksandra; King, Joe; Kodama, Naomi;Kristal, Tali; Kížková, Alena;Lippényi, Zoltán; Melzer, Silvia Maja; Mun, Eunmi; Penner, Andrew; Petersen, Trond; Poje, Andreja; Safi, Mirna; Thaning, Max; Tufail, Zaibu
  • UPF authors
  • MELZER , SILVIA MAJA;
  • Type
  • Scholarly articles
  • Journal títle
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • Publication year
  • 2020
  • Volume
  • 117
  • Number
  • 24
  • Pages
  • 13847-0
  • ISSN
  • 0027-8424
  • Publication State
  • Published
  • Abstract
  • It is well documented that earnings inequalities have risen in many high-income countries. Less clear are the linkages between rising income inequality and workplace dynamics, how within- and between-workplace inequality varies across countries, and to what extent these inequalities are moderated by national labor market institutions. In order to describe changes in the initial between- and within-firm market income distribution we analyze administrative records for 2,000,000,000+ job years nested within 50,000,000+ workplace years for 14 high-income countries in North America, Scandinavia, Continental and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and East Asia. We find that countries vary a great deal in their levels and trends in earnings inequality but that the between-workplace share of wage inequality is growing in almost all countries examined and is in no country declining. We also find that earnings inequalities and the share of between-workplace inequalities are lower and grew less strongly in countries with stronger institutional employment protections and rose faster when these labor market protections weakened. Our findings suggest that firm-level restructuring and increasing wage inequalities between workplaces are more central contributors to rising income inequality than previously recognized.
  • Complete citation
  • Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald; Rainey, Anthony; Avent-Holt, Dustin; Bandelj, Nina; Boza, István; Cort, David; Godechot, Olivier; Hajdu, Gergely; Hällsten, Martin; Folke Henriksen, Lasse; Skeie Hermansen, Are; Hou Feng; Jung, Jiwook; Kanjuo-Mrela, Aleksandra; King, Joe; Kodama, Naomi;Kristal, Tali; Kížková, Alena;Lippényi, Zoltán; Melzer, Silvia Maja; Mun, Eunmi; Penner, Andrew; Petersen, Trond; Poje, Andreja; Safi, Mirna; Thaning, Max; Tufail, Zaibu. Erratum: Rising between-workplace inequalities in high-income countries. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2020; 117(24).
Bibliometric indicators
  • 15 times cited Scopus
  • 17 times cited WOS
  • Índex Scimago de 5.011 (2020)