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ERC=Science2 and the Music Technology Group gathers 22 ERC grantees working in music

ERC=Science2 and the Music Technology Group gathers 22 ERC grantees working in music

The European Research Music Conference is jointly organized by the Music Technology Group (MTG) of UPF’s Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) and the project ERC=Science2, a campaign to disseminate the projects funded by the European Research Council across Europe designed to reach a wide audience, specialists or not, both in Europe and throughout the world. 

13.06.2018

(Original UPF news in this link. Check also all the videos from the conference here)

The European Research Music Conference is jointly organized by the Music Technology Group (MTG) of UPF’s Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) and the projectERC=Science2, a campaign to divulge the projects funded by the ERC across Europe designed to reach a wide audience, specialists or not, both in Europe and throughout the world. The Conference will be held at Pompeu Fabra University from 11 to 13 June in the auditorium of the Poblenou campus (138 Roc Boronat. Barcelona).

Twenty top-level researchers who lead renowned projects with European Research Council grants awarded by the European Commission are to present their research in music and in such diverse areas as musicology, music technology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience and musical cognition.

Experts in artificial intelligence are developing the next generation of tools for musicians

François Pachet it is one of the world’s most renowned experts in artificial intelligence applied to music. He currently directs Spotify’s Creator Technology Research Lab which is developing the next generation of artificial intelligence tools for musicians.  As part of his research, a few months ago, he published the first album created using artificial intelligence, “Hello World”. Previously, he directed the SONY Computer Science Laboratory in Paris where he developed his project Flow-machines, on which this album was based.

Small changes in certain characteristics of sound can affect a person’s emotions without them being aware

Jean-Julien Aucouturier is a researcher at IRCAM, a research centre at the Pompidou Centre in Paris where he directs the CREAM neuroscience laboratory where they are working on audio signal processing to understand the relationship between music and emotions. Aucouturier’s research has explored how small changes in certain characteristics of sound can affect a person’s emotions without them being aware. In his research he has explored the emotional DNA of sounds and created technologies that allow changing them in order to obtain a certain state of mind. Among the many applications, these technologies could prove useful for non-verbal communication with people who suffer from autism or who cannot communicate.

Computational analysis explores the relationship between musical structures and performance

Elaine Chew directs the Music, Performance and Expressivity Lab at the Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary University, London, where they are focusing on the computational analysis of musical structures. Chew is also a pianist and multidisciplinary artist. Her project COSMOS aims to explore the relationship between musical structures and musical performance, that is to say, how the musician is able to define and express these structures musically.

The origins of “absolute music”: tracing emotions in the Italian Opera of the 18th century

Álvaro Torrente is a full professor of History of Music at the Complutense University in Madrid and director of the Complutense Institute of Musical Sciences. The main goal of his project, Didone - The origins of “absolute music”: tracing emotions in the Italian Opera of the 18th century, is the creation of a corpus of 4,000 arias that will be analysed using traditional methods and computer technology (big data). The comparative analysis of dozens of different musical versions of the same scores can teach us how composers relate dramatic circumstances and specific emotions to certain poetical and musical characteristics.

Xavier Serra, conference organizer: breaking the hegemony of the Western cultural model and, at the same time, committed to musical analysis technologies

Xavier Serra it is the organizer of the conference. He received an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council in 2011 for his project CompMusic, dealing with the creation of musical analysis technologies that take music’s cultural specificities into account. Thanks to these technologies he aims to break with the hegemony of the Western cultural model used in most current research and technological developments. Serra is the director of the Music Technology Group (MTG) at UPF and his research focuses on audio signal processing, music technology and computational musicology.

The meeting aims to be a showcase for the breadth of research topics and approaches that are supported by the most prestigious funding of the European Commission. The programme of the European Research Music Conference includes presentations by the principal investigators of the projects, demonstrations, short communications, concerts  and other parallel activities. Regarding the concerts, in the context of the conference, with the participation of PHONOS, two concerts on 11 and 12 June have been scheduled at 6pm on UPF’s Poblenou campus which will also present a selection of musical creation linked to the latest European research.

Conference Programme here.

 

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