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Núria Almiron contributes to David Nibert (ed.)'s "Animal Oppression and Capitalism"

Núria Almiron contributes to David Nibert (ed.)'s "Animal Oppression and Capitalism"

18.12.2017

 

CritiCC's member Núria Almiron has contributed to Animal Oppression and Capitalism, edited by David Nibert. The two-volume set includes art of Sue Coe and has been released this Autumn 2017.

This two-volume set unapologetically documents how capitalism results in the oppression of animals as well as in environmental destruction, vital resource depletion, and climate change. The collection is co-authored by an international community of renowned scholar-activists in critical animal studies that:

  • Explain how abolishing the oppression of animals will bring to an end the suffering of billions of sentient creatures throughout the world, greatly improve human health, and help turn back the rapid advance of climate change.
  • Connect the daily processes of capitalism to tremendous levels of pain, misery, and fear experienced by animals as well as humans.
  • Document the ways in which many animals are biologically engineered for profitable exploitation.

Almiron’s chapter, “Slaves to Entertainment: Manufacturing Consent for Orcas in Captivity”, addresses the political economy of orcas in captivity—a relatively new phenomenon with an easily traceable history—to illustrate the three factors deemed necessary for the development and perpetuation of oppression according to the theory of oppression: i) competition for resources, ii) economic interest of an elite, and iii) ideological conditioning for obtaining the social rationalization and legitimization of human actions. The chapter is organized in accordance with these three entangled forces. First, the history of whaling is briefly introduced to show how our perspective of whales, and more particularly, orcas was initially driven by the competition for resources. Second, the business of orcas in captivity is presented as evidence of how orca abuse has been motivated primarily by economic interests. And finally, the chapter describes the ideological conditioning constructed by the industry’s public relations and lobbying arms to legitimize the exploitation of orcas.

Nibert, D. (ed.) (2017). Animal Oppression and capitalism. Volumes I and II. Santa Babara, CA: Praeger

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