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Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick presents the Selective Exposure Self- and Affect-Management (SESAM) model at a CAS workshop

Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick presents the Selective Exposure Self- and Affect-Management (SESAM) model at a CAS workshop

Dr. Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, professor at Ohio State University (USA) and editor of the ISI-ranked journal Media Psychology gave the workshop “The SESAM – Invite to a Research Conversation on Selective Exposure and its Consequences”.

20.10.2015

On October 15, Dr. Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, professor at Ohio State University (USA) and editor of the ISI-ranked journal Media Psychology gave the workshop “The SESAM – Invite to a Research Conversation on Selective Exposure and its Consequences”. The seminar was organized by the Communication, Advertising and Society Research Group (CAS) of the Department of Communication at UPF.

 

During the session, Knobloch-Westerwick presented the Selective Exposure Self- and Affect-Management (SESAM) model, which she has used in many of her research. The key premises of her work are that exposure is always selective (that, is that audience shows preference for a given medium or message), that media consumers are very dynamic and that self-perception strongly affects behaviour. Bearing those assumptions in mind, Knobloch-Westerwick delved into the five propositions of the SESAM model. They are listed as follows: (1) much of habitual media use serves to increase coherence and positivity of self-concept; (2) much of media use serves affect regulation and adaptation to situational requirements, including behaviour regulation; (3) selective media use affects self-concept (primarily) through priming and social comparisons; (4) selective activation of self aspects facilitates cognitive, affective and motivational regulation; and (5) activated self-concept, in turn, affects selective media use.

 

In her talk, the researcher illustrated these propositions with many investigations that she has conducted. Those examples showed that selective exposure matters and that it has many applicable domains, ranging from political communication (such as the study of the reinforcement of attitudes and partisanship before a presidential election) to communication and gender identity (like the examination of how selective magazine reading reinforces gender conformity). Other relevant fields of inquiry include the selective media use for mood management and mood adjustment, the social identity effects on selective exposure to news or the selective social comparison with thin-ideal media portrayals

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